The Right of Access to Justice in Serbia during the Coronavirus Pandemic
November 20, 2020

The Right of Access to Justice in Serbia during the Coronavirus Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic is a global health crisis and the measures taken to combat its spread have been some of the most disruptive events to daily life that humankind has faced since the 1918 flu pandemic. So far, the coronavirus has affected a multiplicity of countries and territories around the world, with more than 53 million cases registered by November 2020.

Faced with the challenge of protecting public health and preventing the further spread of the virus, the Republic of Serbia declared a state of emergency on 15 March 2020. The Constitution permits the state to derogate from certain rights guaranteed by the Constitution, but only to the extent required by the severity of the situation. 

 

The Malaysian Court's Accessibility to Justice in the Time of COVID-19
October 21, 2020

The Malaysian Court's Accessibility to Justice in the Time of COVID-19

As the world watched in dismay at the distressing consequences of COVID-19, what held us together in Malaysia is the belief that nothing is insurmountable. Thus, with characteristic stoicism, the Malaysian Judiciary put several measures in place, for it is inconceivable that the administration and accessibility to justice should come to a grinding halt.

Even if the courts are not listed as 'essential services' under the relevant regulation, the enabling provision of the Prevention of Infectious Diseases Act (1988) allowed certain protective measures to be put in place to ensure that COVID-19 is curbed and confined. As such, comprehensive Standard Operating Procedures for the courts were formulated, incorporating both the form and substance of court administration.

 

20 years after the signing of UNTOC, crime prevention remains a multidimensional endeavour
October 16, 2020

20 years after the signing of UNTOC, crime prevention remains a multidimensional endeavour

Not a day passes without stories of organized crime making their way to the front pages of newspapers around the world. Despite copious legislation and strong law enforcement measures in most countries, criminal groups find ways to operate outside the rule of law across borders, causing immense physical, psychological, and financial damage to their victims.

Governments have since long joined efforts in combatting organized crime even as it continues to become more emboldened. With the United Nations Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime (UNTOC), signed in Palermo, Italy in 2000, they devised an international instrument enabling their collective fight against transnational organized crime. 

Judicial Integrity - Events - Exploring the Effects of Organized Crime and Corruption on the Integrity and Independence of the Judiciary
October 7, 2020

Exploring the Effects of Organized Crime and Corruption on the Integrity and Independence of the Judiciary

UNODC's Judicial Integrity Team, together with the UN Special Rapporteur on the Independence of Judge and Lawyers, will contextualize the problem of judicial corruption arising from organized crime and illustrate its effects on the independence, integrity and impartiality of the judiciary. The panel will highlight the applicable international legal frameworks as well as good practices for preventing and combating corruption linked to organized crime. It will also promote specific resources of the Global Judicial Integrity Network available to improve training on judicial integrity principles and provide updates on other relevant work being carried out by the Special Rapporteur.

The Practical Experience of Chinese Courts in Promoting Judicial Integrity
September 10, 2020

The Practical Experience of Chinese Courts in Promoting Judicial Integrity

Since ancient times, China has always advocated for a culture of integrity. The famous philosopher Confucius once said, "An intellectual who inspires himself in the pursuit of truth, but is ashamed of old clothes and coarse food, is not worth consulting." Attaching great importance to judicial integrity, China's Chief Justice Zhou Qiang clearly points out that "Judicial corruption should be resolutely punished with a zero-tolerance attitude." The  Criminal Law of the People's Republic of China and the  Judges Law of the People's Republic of China have made provisions for the corrupt behaviour of judges, such as the perversion of justice for bribes and abuse of power.