Wildlife crime: Don't be part of it!


The illicit trade of wildlife in Asia is worth billions of dollars a year. It fuels organized crime, corruption and violence. This new UNODC video vividly illustrates wildlife crime's tragic toll of destruction. It asks viewers to make a difference by changing their consumption habits today. You can drive change. Share this video today. Available in: English Mandarin Thai Vietnamese.

 

Myanmar Office

 

UNODC in the News

 
 
 

Myanmar Office

What's New

Golden Triangle opium production rises 22% in 2013, says UNODC

Bangkok (Thailand), 18 December 2013 - Led by a 13 per cent increase in Myanmar opium cultivation to 57,800 hectares (from 51,000 ha in 2012), opium poppy cultivation in Southeast Asia's Golden Triangle of Myanmar, Lao PDR and Thailand rose for the seventh consecutive year, according to a UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) report... [Read More]

EU, UNODC, US Joint Delegation to Shan State

Yangon, 10 December 2013 - On December 2-6, EU Ambassador Roland Kobia, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime Country Manager Jason Eligh and U.S. Ambassador Derek Mitchell conducted a joint mission to southern and eastern Shan State to gain first-hand knowledge of the security, peacebuilding and developmental challenges... [Read More]

Weak rule of law and lack of good governance a major threat to development, says UNODC Executive Director

Bangkok (Thailand), 15 November 2013 - UNODC Executive Director Mr. Yury Fedotov said today that investments in justice systems and the rule of law were "pre-requisites" for long-term prosperity. Mr. Fedotov made his comments in his keynote speech at the inaugural Bangkok Dialogue on the Rule of Law, organized by Thailand's Institute of... [Read More]

14/11/13 - New UNODC SE Asia regional programme addresses transnational organized crime and downsides of regional integration

08/11/13 - Record-high methamphetamine seizures in Southeast Asia

22/10/13 - Bringing hope to former opium-growing Laos communities

All Stories from Myanmar