Sir Thomas Wentworth Russell

Abstract

On April 10th 1954 Sir Thomas Wentworth Russell, K.B.E., C.M.G., widely known throughout the world as Russell Pasha, died in London.

Details

Pages: 76 to 76
Creation Date: 1954/01/01

Sir Thomas Wentworth Russell

On April 10th 1954 Sir Thomas Wentworth Russell, K.B.E., C.M.G., widely known throughout the world as Russell Pasha, died in London.

For everybody connected with the control of narcotics, Russell Pasha was not only a legendary figure but a man well known from the days of the Advisory Committee of the League of Nations where, ever since his first appearance in January 1930, he impressed all those who had the honour and the pleasure of working with him with his great intelligence, his profound knowledge of everything connected with narcotics and his keen sense of humour which showed a deep understanding of human nature.

Born on 22 November 1879, educated at Haileybury and Trinity College, Cambridge, he joined the Egyptian Civil Service in 1902 and formed the Camel Corps before becoming, in 1917, commandant of the Cairo Police, a post in which he showed himself both efficient and resourceful. As head of the Central Narcotics Intelligence Bureau, which the Egyptian Government set up in 1929, he was responsible for the outstanding reports to the Advisory Committee which still constitute a very important source of information on illicit traffic and illicit traffickers. He was not only a great civil servant but a man of action and some of the episodes he described in his fascinating book Egyptian Service are more exciting than any fiction.

With him disappeared a great international figure. The Bulletin on Narcotics wishes to extend its heartful condolence to his family.