Note Changes in the scope of control

Abstract

During 1966 information was received from the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland concerning extension of control to three new synthetic substances, and the World Health Organization found that:

Details

Pages: 47 to 48
Creation Date: 1966/01/01

Note Changes in the scope of control

During 1966 information was received from the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland concerning extension of control to three new synthetic substances, and the World Health Organization found that:

1. tetrahydro-7α-(1-hydroxy-1-methylbutyl)-6,14- endoetheno-oripavine also designated as 7,8-dihydro-7α-[1 (R)-hydroxy-1-methylbutyl]- O 6-methyl-6,14- endoethenomorphine (the proposed international non-proprietary name of which is etorphine), is liable to similar abuse and productive of similar ill effects as the drugs in Schedule I of the Single Convention. WHO, therefore, recommended that etorphine be added to Schedule I of that Convention.

WHO has also found that etorphine is particularly liable to abuse and to produce ill effects and that such liability is not offset by substantial therapeutic advantages not possessed by substances other than drugs in Schedule IV of the Single Convention and that the use of etorphine in man should, therefore, be restricted to its applications in medical and scientific research, but its use for the handling of animals should be allowed. WHO accordingly recommended that etorphine should be placed on Schedule IV of the Single Convention provided this permits its use in animals.

2. 3- O-acetyl-tetrahydro-7α-(1-hydroxy-1-methylbutyl)-6,14- endoetheno- oripavine, also designated as O 3-acetyl-7,8-dihydro-7α-[1(R)-hydroxy-1-methylbutyl]-O 6-methyl-6,14- endoethenomorphine (the proposed international non-proprietary name of which is acetorphine), is liable to similar abuse and productive of similar ill effects as the drugs in Schedule I of the Single Convention . WHO, therefore, recommended that acetorphine be added to Schedule I of that Convention.

WHO has also found that acetorphine is particularly liable to abuse and to produce ill effects and that such liability is not offset by substantial therapeutic advantages not possessed by substances other than drugs in Schedule IV of the Single Convention and that the use of acetorphine in man should, therefore, be restricted to its applications in medical and scientific research, but its use for the handling of animals should be allowed. WHO accordingly recommended that acetorphine should be placed on Schedule IV of the Single Convention provided this permits its use in animals.

3. N-cyclopropylmethyltetrahydro-7α-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-6,14- endoethenonororipavine, also designated as N-cyclopropylmethyl-7,8-dihydro-7α-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)- O 6-methyl-6,14- endoethenonormorphine.

The WHO has found that N-cyclopropylmethyl-7,8-dihydro-7α-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)- O 6-methyl-6,14- endoethenonormorphine (the proposed international nonproprietary name of which is cyprenorphine) should be considered as not being liable to similar abuse and not being productive of similar ill effects as the drugs in Schedule I or Schedule II of the Single Convention. WHO recommended, therefore, that cyprenorphine should not be placed on any of the schedules of' the Single Convention.

The matter of placing etorphine and acetorphine in Schedule IV of the Single Convention was deferred by the Commission on Narcotic Drugs until its next session in December

1967; the other WHO recommendations were adopted by it by a vote of its members taken by mail, and went into effect under article 3, paragraph 7, of the Single Convention.

WHO decided also that the drug 6-nicotinyldihydrocodeine (the proposed international non-proprietary name of which is nicodicodine), in reference to which a notification has been made by the Government of France, should be placed under the regime of control laid down in the 1931 Convention for the drugs specified in article 1, paragraph 2, Group I of that Convention (the drug is automatically included in Schedule I of the Single Convention of 1961, being an ester and ether of dihydromorphine, which is listed in that schedule).