Third special session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs

Sections

Representation at the session
Question of the periodicity of the Commission's sessions
Illicit traffic and regional co-operation to control it
SUB-COMMISSION ON ILLICIT TRAFFIC AND RELATED MATTERS IN THE NEAR AND MIDDLE EAST
Ad Hoc COMMITTEE FOR THE FAR-EAST REGION
REGIONAL CO-OPERATION IN SOUTH AMERICA
Drug abuse (drug addiction)
Convention on Psychotropic Substances
Scientific research
Opium poppy cultivation
Operations financed by the United Nations Fund for Drug Abuse Control
Revised form of annual reports
Programme of work and priorities
Amendments to the Schedules of substances under international control
Report of the International Narcotics Control Board
ANNEXES
I E/RES/1848(LVI) Periodicity of Commission sessions*
II E/RES/1844(LVI) Abuse of Customs transit systems by drug smugglers*
III E/RES/1845(LVI) Co-operation for drug law enforcement in the Far East region *
IV E/RES/1847(LVI) 1971 Convention on Psychotropic Substances: ratifications and accessions *
V Reduction of summary records
VI E/RES/1846(LVI) Cultivation and chewing of the coca leaf: clandestine manufacture of and illicit traffic in cocaine*

Details

Pages: 57 to 68
Creation Date: 1974/01/01

Third special session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs

Introduction

The Commission on Narcotic Drugs held its third special session at Geneva from 18 February to 1 March 1974. In 1969, the Economic and Social Council had decided that some of its functional commissions should meet only every two years, but the Commission had considered that, in view of the nature of its work, it would be necessary for it to hold a special session in 1974, when it normally should not have met, and the Council had decided to endorse that recommendation.

The agenda included the following questions: illicit traffic; drug abuse; revised form for annual reports; operations financed by the United Nations Fund for Drug Abuse Control; report of the International Narcotics Control Board for 1973; scientific research; poppy cultivation under properly controlled conditions so as to meet the world's requirements of opium for medical and scientific purposes; notifications under the international treaties; periodicity of the Commission's sessions; and programme of work and priorities.

Representation at the session

All States members of the Commission were represented at the third special session, namely, Argentina; Australia; Brazil; Canada; Chile; Egypt; France; Germany, Federal Republic of; Hungary; India; Indonesia; Iran; Jamaica; Japan; Kenya; Mexico; Morocco; Nigeria; Pakistan; Peru; Romania; Sweden; Switzerland; Thailand; Togo; Turkey; Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; United States of America; and Yugoslavia.

Third special session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs. 57

Full size image: 72 kB, Third special session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs. 57

The following States sent observers: Afghanistan, Algeria, Belgium, Bolivia, Bulgaria, Burma, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Finland, Greece, Holy See, Iraq, Italy, Kuwait, Malaysia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Panama, Philippines, Poland, Republic of Viet-Nam, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Tunisia and Uruguay.

The following United Nations bodies were represented at the session: the United Nations Fund for Drug Abuse Control (UNFDAC), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the United Nations Social Defence Research Institute and the United Nations Division of Social Affairs. The International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) was also represented. Representatives of the following specialized agencies attended the session: the World Health Organization (WHO), the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

The International Criminal Police Organization (ICPO/Interpol), an organization having a special agreement with the Economic and Social Council, was represented at the session.

The Customs Co-operation Council (CCC) and the International Arab Narcotics Bureau of the League of Arab States were represented.

The following inter-governmental organizations were also represented: the Colombo Plan Bureau and the Council of Europe.

The following non-governmental organizations in consultative status, category 11, also attended: the International Confederation of Catholic Charities (Caritas Inter-nationalis), the International Council on Alcohol and Addictions and the International Federation of Women Lawyers.

The Commission elected the following officers by acclamation: Mr. C. Kirca (Turkey), Chairman; Dr. B. Bolcs (Hungary), First Vice-Chairman; Mr. F. Castro y Castro (Mexico), Second Vice-Chairman; Mr. Jasjit Singh (India), Rapporteur.

Question of the periodicity of the Commission's sessions

Many representatives in the Commission reiterated the opinion already expressed at previous sessions that it would be difficult for the Commission to fulfil its mandate if it met only every two years. The Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, 1961, had been drafted on the assumption that the Commission would meet annually. Article 15 of that Convention provided that the annual report of the International Narcotics Control Board should be submitted to the Council through the Commission, "which may make such comments as it sees fit". In addition, the Commission had to keep a very close watch on the trends of the drug abuse and illicit traffic situations, which changed rapidly and could not be assessed on a two-yearly basis. The operations carried out by the Fund also had to be followed with the closest attention. The Commission decided to recommend to the Economic and Social Council to adopt a resolution stating that the principles of biennial sessions of functional commissions and the need for more frequent meetings of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs could both be recognized by convening special sessions of the Commission for the duration of the current emergency and providing that the Commission should hold a special session of two weeks in 1976 in addition to its regular session scheduled for 1975, the special session to be held at Geneva. The Council would further recommend that the Commission should consider, at its special session in 1976, whether another special session needed to be held in 1978. [ 1]

Illicit traffic and regional co-operation to control it

The Commission noted that a growing number of countries had become more aware of the dangers of drug abuse and had improved and strengthened their law enforcement services to deal with them. Many Governments had reported substantial increases in the quantity and variety of drugs seized. While some of those increases probably marked extensions of illicit traffic, many undoubtedly represented genuine successes for law enforcement services. The Commission also noted that the quantities of opium and morphine base seized had increased. Similarly, seizures of heroin had sharply increased between 1970 and 1972. The same was true of cocaine, seizures of which had earlier been negligible, but which reached significant proportions in 1971 and 1972. Cannabis in various forms had been trafficked very widely and cannabis resin (hashish) had often been carried long distances. Of all the drugs of abuse, cannabis had been the most widely trafficked in the world. The Commission noted the emergence and development of illicit traffic in liquid cannabis or cannabis oil, a particularly dangerous substance because of its high tetrahydrocannabinol content. The quantities of LSD seized in North America and Europe had shown a tendency to decline, but had increased in the Middle East, Asia and the Far East. Finally, the Commission noted that one of the main factors in the spread of drug trafficking in recent years had been the increase in travel by young people, many of whom were responsible for introducing psychotropic substances to the Near and Middle East and Africa and for importing cannabis and, in particular, cannabis resin, to Europe and North America.

The Commission noted with satisfaction that, in accordance with its request, the question of the abuse of the TIR carnet system had been considered by the Inland Transport Committee of ECE, which had adopted a resolution recommending that Governments should give particular attention to the abuse of Customs transit systems by drug smugglers. The Commission supported that recommendation and recommended that Governments should ensure the most expeditious and full exchange of information bilaterally, regionally and with ICPO/Interpol concerning investigations and control. [ 2]

SUB-COMMISSION ON ILLICIT TRAFFIC AND RELATED MATTERS IN THE NEAR AND MIDDLE EAST

At its twenty-fourth session, the Commission established an Ad Hoc Committee on Illicit Traffic in the Near and Middle East to study matters relating to illicit drug traffic in that region for the purpose of promoting more effective co-operation and mutual assistance in the suppression of illicit traffic within, from and into that region. At its twenty-fifth session, the Commission recommended that the Economic and Social Council should adopt a resolution authorizing the conversion of the Ad Hoc Committee into a Sub-Commission composed of the same members, namely, Afghanistan, Iran, Pakistan, Sweden and Turkey, whose task would be to study the implementation of the recommendations of the Ad Hoc Committee, to propose for that purpose supplementary recommendations to the Commission on Narcotic Drugs and to make any other recommendations it might consider necessary. Since the Economic and Social Council had acceded to the Commission's request, the Sub-Commission held its first meeting during the Commission's third special session.

1. For the text of the Council's resolution, see annex I.

2. Ibid., II.

Ad Hoc COMMITTEE FOR THE FAR-EAST REGION

At its twenty-fifth session, for the same purpose of developing regional co-operation, the Commission decided to set up an Ad Hoc Committee to consider the possibility of establishing a sub-commission in the South-East Asia region to promote more effective co-operation and mutual assistance in the suppression of illicit traffic within, from and into that region. That Committee, composed of representatives of Australia, India, Indonesia, Japan, Thailand and the United Kingdom and observers from ICPO/ Interpol and INCB, visited Sri Lanka, Malaysia, the Republic of Viet-Nam, Laos, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Thailand and Singapore and submitted a report containing a number of recommendations, of which the Commission took note with satisfaction. In that connexion, the Commission decided to recommend to the Economic and Social Council to request the Secretary-General to convene regular meetings of operational heads of the national narcotic law enforcement agencies of the countries of the region, to be held by rotation in the various countries and in which ICPO/ Interpol, the Customs Co-operation Council and other competent international bodies would participate as observers. [ 3]

REGIONAL CO-OPERATION IN SOUTH AMERICA

A South American Plenipotentiary Conference on Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances was held at Buenos Aires in April 1973. It was attended by nine States, namely, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela. The Conference adopted an agreement requesting, inter alia, that each country should establish a national co-ordination and centralization body for all matters relating to drug abuse. Other articles of the agreement dealt with elimination of the cultivation of cannabis and the coca bush, the prohibition of opium poppy cultivation, means of ensuring close co-operation, exchanges of information, joint investigations and the harmonization of legislation for the suppression of illicit traffic, the establishment of uniform rules for control of the licit trade in drugs of abuse, and the penal and civil legislation to be enacted by the States parties.

Drug abuse (drug addiction)

The Commission noted that drug abuse was continuing throughout the world and that there had been an increase in the abuse of psychotropic substances, such as barbiturates, amphetamines and hallucinogens. It also expressed concern at the increased abuse of khat and methaqualone. It considered the methodological problems raised by the preparation of a reliable comparative study on drug abuse. The present system had serious deficiencies; in particular, the dividing line between the medical use of drugs and drug abuse was not as clear as might be assumed. Proposals were made for a number of possible solution, which should, in particular, take account of the fact that the developing countries did not have adequate administrative machinery to compile detailed statistics. The Commission studied the question of the registration of addicts, their treatment and their rehabilitation and reviewed drug abuse patterns in the various regions, noting once again the increasing trend towards multiple drug addiction, i.e. the abusive consumption of several drugs at the same time.

3. Ibid., III.

Convention on Psychotropic Substances

The Commission expressed its conviction that the Convention on Psychotropic Substances constituted a necessary instrument in the fight against the abuse of and the illicit traffic in such substances and recommended to the Economic and Social Council to urge Governments and in particular, Governments of countries directly related to the manufacture and production of and trade in psychotropic substances, to ratify or accede to the Convention on Psychotropic Substances as soon as possible. [ 4]

Scientific research

The Commission expressed its appreciation of the substantial progress achieved in the United Nations research programmes and of the work carried out by the United Nations Laboratory in the past year. The Laboratory had supplied collaborating scientists with the samples they needed, particularly reference samples of cannabis which it had prepared. The Commission noted that the United Nations Laboratory had extended its investigations on the chemistry of cannabis and its components and had also continued to co-ordinate, as required and as far as possible, the research being carried out in various countries, in order to avoid duplication of effort. It also noted the progress made in research on Papaver bracteatum, a species of poppy yielding thebaine, which, by a chemical process, could be converted into codeine. It considered that it was necessary further to intensify research on khat. It was informed that, in accordance with its wishes, the United Nations Laboratory, in co-operation with interested national authorities, had been carrying out research on suitable methods for the identification of drugs of abuse by enforcement officers and that a Consultant Group had been convened to study that question. The Group had recommended certain field test procedures for use by enforcement officers. The Commission noted with satisfaction that the Laboratory had provided technical assistance for the training of specialists and that it had received fellowship-holders from six countries for that purpose. It expressed the hope that the Laboratory would be able to provide assistance for the devlopment of national laboratories in regions directly affected by the illicit traffic. It noted the great value of the collection of scientific publications on drugs which had been established by the Laboratory, thus facilitating its response to requests for scientific information.

Opium poppy cultivation

The Commission's agenda included an item relating to poppy cultivation under properly controlled conditions so as to meet world requirements of opium for medical and scientific purposes. At the Commission's twenty-fifth session emphasis had been laid on the difficulties of obtaining sufficient opium for medical purpose.

4. Ibid., IV.

The Commission took note of the statements by the Director of the Division of Narcotic Drugs and the President of INCB describing the possible means of remedying that state of affairs. In particular, the Commission had before it, in considering the question, an appendix to the INCB report for 1973. A full debate took place on the question in the course of which the various possible sources of codeine supply were discussed : opium, poppy straw and Papaver bracteatum. The Commission noted that no suitable substitute for codeine was likely to be available for a long time. The members of the Commission expressed the view that no hasty decision should be taken regarding the source from which any future additional requirements should be met and it reaffirmed the basic principles of the international narcotics treaties. A number of delegations emphasized that in order to achieve the desired results manufacturers should, as far as possible, prepare long-term estimates, and that the Governments of manufacturing countries should scrutinize such estimates very closely so as to give exporting countries the greatest possible assistance in working out their plans to meet the legitimate demand. There appeared to be general agreement on the need to foster research at the national level on the means of obtaining sufficient quantities of codeine for medical requirements and to co-ordinate such research at the international level; it was emphasized that the United Nations Narcotics Laboratory had an important part to play in that connexion. The Commission requested INCB to follow up its work and to keep it informed on the supply and demand equation. It requested the Division of Narcotic Drugs to keep abreast of developments and to inform the Commission accordingly and requested the United Nations Narcotics Laboratory to explore areas in which research might be usefully undertaken or continued and to report to the Commission on the subject at its next session. The representative of the United States of America announced in that connexion that his Government would make a contribution to UNFDAC, part of which would be earmarked for such research. [ 5]

Operations financed by the United Nations Fund for Drug Abuse Control

The Commission considered the report of the Acting Executive Director on operations financed by UNFDAC. That report presented a summary of progress to date in a number of individual projects, set forth the medium- and short-term objectives of the Fund and presented a programme for the biennium 1974-1975. It also reported on the current status of the organizational structure and on the progress made in improving co-ordination of the activities of the United Nations system, in particular through the establishment of the Inter-Agency Advisory Committee on Drug Abuse Control. The Commission took note of this report and requested the Secretary-General to communicate it, together with the observations of the Governments of member States and observers as well as those of the specialized agencies, to the competent organizations and, in particular, to the Inter-Agency Advisory Committee. Pledges announced by thirty Governments up to 31 October 1973 had brought the total resources of the Fund to approximately $10 million. During the session a number of delegations announced further contributions (including a contribution in kind in the case of one delegation) that would bring the total resources of the Fund up to approximately $13.5 million. [ 6] The Commission expressed satisfaction with the general orientation of the Fund's policy in giving priority to the developing countries and particularly those demonstating a need for assistance. The composition and balance of the programme were found generally satisfactory, although a preponderant share of funds was devoted to the reduction of supply. Several delegations however, emphasized the need for more action programmes in the general area of demand, namely in prevention, treatment and rehabilitation, and for research on the causes of drug abuse and on medical and social problems.

5. Since the contribution amounts to $US 2 million, the sum of $US 800,000 would be earmarked for research on this subject.

6. The Acting Executive Director Stressed that, despite the generosity of certain Governments, the financial problem remained serious in view of the requests made by a number of Governments for assistance with country programmes which would inevitably be costly.

The majority of members of the Commission welcomed the efforts made to improve co-ordination, particularly the establishment of the Inter-Agency Advisory Committee on Drug Abuse Control. The Commission cautioned that the terms of reference of the Inter-Agency Advisory Committee should not require it to duplicate the work of the Commission or infringe on its prerogatives.

The Commission heard statements by representatives of several specialized agencies which are members of the Inter-Agency Committee and are co-operating with the Fund and the Division in the execution of programmes. An account was given of the participation of those agencies and of future prospects in that respect.

Revised form of annual reports

At its twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth sessions, the Commission had considered the preparatory measures to be taken for the coming into force of the Convention on Psychotropic Substances and had suggested certain guidelines that the Secretarait should follow in drafting a revised form of annual report for submission to the Commission at its third special session. The Secretariat accordingly presented a draft form for the Commission's consideration. The Commission welcomed the fact that, in preparing this document, the Secretariat had tried to eliminate questions which might overlap with the activities of other international bodies, to introduce the new questions required to cover reporting on psychotropic substances, to rationalize the presentation of the subject matter of the questionnaire and to facilitate in every possible way the task of the governmental authorities responsible for reporting. A majority of the representatives, however, felt that the draft document was too long and too detailed, contained superfluous questions, and in certain instances exceeded what could reasonably be asked of Governments in the way of information on the implementation of international treaties in their territories. After a partial examination of the document before it, the Commission thought it advisable to adjourn the discussion of the subject to its twenty-sixth session and requested the Secretariat to prepare a new draft document.

Programme of work and priorities

The Commission established its programme of work and priorities in the light of the work done during its third special session and decided to adopt the following order of priorities for its twenty-sixth session : illicit traffic; form of annual reports; report of INCB; drug abuse; poppy cultivation under properly controlled conditions so as to meet word requirements of opium for medical and scientific purposes; operations financed by the United Nations Fund for Drug Abuse Control; scientific research; the problem of cannabis; the question of khat. In addition; the Division would include in its research programme the investigation of the possibilities of improving the situation concerning the provision of adequate supplies of codeine for medical purposes without creating a risk of the diversion of drugs of abuse into the illicit traffic. The President of INCB stated that the Board would review the position regarding the supply of and demand for narcotics for medical and scientific purposes either in its annual reports or in some other convenient form.

The Commission noted that in accordance with instructions of the General Assembly, continuing efforts had been made to simplify and shorten the documents prepared by the Division. In accordance with resolutions of the Economic and Social Council and the General Assembly the Commission dispensed with summary records at its third special session except for five items on its agenda. It decided in that connexion that summary records for its future sessions should be kept to a minimum and that the Commission would determine at the beginning of each session which agenda items are to be covered by summary records. [ 7]

Amendments to the Schedules of substances under international control

In the performance of its functions under the international treaties, the Commission decided, in accordance with the recommendation by the World Health Organization to include difenoxin (or diphenoxylic acid) in Schedule I of the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, 1961, and to include in Schedule III of the same Convention preparations of difenoxin containing, per dosage unit, a maximum of 0.5 mg of difenoxin and a quantity of atropine sulphate equal to at least 5 per cent of the quantity of difenoxin. In addition, the Commission was informed of the decision taken by WHO that difenoxin and its salts should fall under the regime laid down in the 1931 Convention for the drugs specified in article 1, paragraph 2, Group I, of that Convention.

At the Commission's twenty-fifth session, a request had been made that WHO should undertake preliminary work on the question of the salts and esters of the substances listed in the 1971 Convention. The representative of WHO stressed that his organization was willing to take appropriate action but in view of the fact that the 1971 Convention had not yet entered into force, no measures had so far been taken. He gave an assurance, however that WHO was preparing to deal with the technical problems of completing the schedules of the 1971 Convention even before that instrument entered into force.

Report of the International Narcotics Control Board

The Commission considered the INCB report for 1973, which was introduced by Sir Harry Greenfield, President of the Board. The Chairman of the Commission expressed gratitude and admiration for what Sir Harry had accomplished in the field of drug control since 1946. His work should be considered as an example for al1 those who would follow him. All the representatives and observers who spoke during the discussion associated themselves with the Chairman's tribute to Sir Harry Greenfield and expressed their appreciation of his outstanding merits as well as of the qualifications and work of the six other outgoing members of the Board.

In connexion with the discussion of the INCB report and with reference also to the review of the illicit traffic in narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances during 1971 and 1972, the Commission recommended to the Economic and Social Council the adoption of a draft resolution under which the Council would recommend the

Governments concerned to intensify measures designed to reduce coca cultivation, to eliminate the clandestine manufacture of and the illicit traffic in cocaine and, in accordance with the 1961 Convention, to abolish coca-leaf chewing, if possible before the expiry of the twenty-five year period provided for in article 49 of that Convention; it so recommended intensification of regional co-operation by the countries concerned and invited all States and the competent international agencies and bodies to co-operate with the Governments concerned in the search for a solution. [ 8]

ANNEXES

[ Resolutions marked with an asterisk were submitted in draft form by the Commission to the Economic and Social Council for adoption at its 56th session. The Council at its 1896th plenary meeting adopted these resolutions, in the form as they appear in these annexes, on 15 May 1974.]

I E/RES/1848(LVI) Periodicity of Commission sessions*

The Economic and Social Council,

Noting with the concern that problem of drug abuse remains serious,

Recognizing that these circumstances require continuing vigilance by the Commission on Narcotic Drugs,

  1. Decides that, for the present, the principle of biennial sessions of functional commissions and the need for more frequent meetings of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs can both be recognized by convening special sessions of the Commission as necessary;

  2. Further decides that the Commission should consider, at its regular session scheduled for 1975, whether to meet in special session for two weeks in 1976;

  3. Suggests that whenever it is decided to hold a special session, the posibility of reducing the following regular session to two weeks instead of the three weeks originally provided for should be examined and decided on by the Commission.

II E/RES/1844(LVI) Abuse of Customs transit systems by drug smugglers*

The Economic and Social Council,

Recalling articles 18 and 35 of the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, 1961, [ 1] and article 21 of the Convention on Psychotropic Substances, [ 2] of 1971,

Noting that illicit traffic in narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances in many areas of the world remains serious in terms of volume and areas involved,

Expressing its satisfaction that efforts are being made by Governments, internally, bilaterally, regionally and multilaterally, to detect and suppress illicit traffic and to apprehend and punish traffickers,

Noting with approval the resolution adopted by the Inland Transport Committee of the Economic Commission for Europe, [ 3] which calls for urgent attention by Governments to the problems of the abuse of customs transit systems by drug smugglers,

1. United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 520, No. 7515, p. 151.

2. E/CONF.58/6 and Corr.1 and 2.

3. ECE/TRANS/8, annex 1, resolution No. 220.

Emphasizing the importance of Governments co-operating with one another, bilaterally, regionally and multilaterally, to ensure the most prompt and full exchange of information concerning illicit drug traffic,

  1. Recommends that Governments give urgent attention to problem of abuse of custom transit systems by drug smugllers;

  2. Recommends that Governments ensure the most expeditious and full exchange of information, bilaterally, regionally and with International Criminal Police Organisation (ICPO/Interpol), concerning investigations and control;

  3. Reminds Governments, in particular, of their obligation to communicate to the Secretary-General promptly information concerning cases of illicit traffic which are of international significance and, in this connexion, to specify full particular relating to seizures including modes of transit and the customs transit systems used;

  4. Requests the Secretary-General to communicate the present resolution to Governments for their urgent consideration and appropriate action.

III E/RES/1845(LVI) Co-operation for drug law enforcement in the Far East region *

The Economic and Social Council,

Recalling its resolution 1780 (LIV) of 18 May 1973 by which it established an Ad Hoc Committee for the Far East Region,

Noting with satisfaction the report [ 4] of the Committee and recommendations [ 5] therein made [ 2] ,

  1. Endorses the recommendations of the Ad hoc Committee for the Far East Region and commends them to the Governments concerned and to the Secretary-General with a view to their appropriate implementation;

  2. Requests the Secretary-General to convene regular meetings of operational heads of the national narcotic law enforcement agencies of the countries of the region [ 6] , taking into account the arrangements proposed by the Committee and contained in its recommendation (iv);

  3. Recommends that the expense of the aforementioned regional meetings and travel expenses and subsistence of one participant from each country in the region should be borne by the United Nations Fund for Drug Abuse Control;

  4. Decides that these meetings should be held in the capital of one of the countries of the region which is close to the centre of the trafficking routes, or by rotation in capitals which are relatively central;

  5. Inivites the International Narcotics Control Board to participate as an observer in these regional meetings;

  6. Authorizes the Secretary-General to invite as participants observers from the International Criminal Police Organization (ICPO/Interpol), the Customs Co-operation Council and other competent international organizations, such observers to participate at their own expense;

  7. Invites the Chairman of the Committee to report on the meetings, through the Secretary-General, to the Commission on Narcotic Drugs;

  8. Further invites the Secretary-General to report to the Commission periodically and not less frequently than biennially, on any significant developments in the illicit traffic situation in the region

4. E/CN.7/563-E/CN 7/AC.11/1 and Corr. 1.

5. Ibid., para. 158.

6. Ibid., para 3.

IV E/RES/1847(LVI) 1971 Convention on Psychotropic Substances: ratifications and accessions *

The Economic and Social Council,

Recalling its resolution 1773 (LIV) of 18 May 1973 and General Assembly resolution 3147 (XXVIII) of 14 December 1973, in particular, paragraph 2 of the latter resolution,

Conscious of the public health and social problems resulting from abuse of psychotropic substances,

Noting with concern the increasing abuse of and illicit traffic in psychotropic substances,

Noting also the statement of the International Narcotics Control Board in its report for 1973 [ 7] that the situation should not be allowed to drift further and that the Board trusts that all Governments which have not already done so will urgently consider ratifying the Convention on Psychotropic Substances of 1971, remembering that abstention by a single country trading in these substances may result in evasion of internal controls in other countries,

Convinced that the Convention constitutes a necessary instrument in the fight against the abuse of and the illicit traffic in such substances,

Urges Governments, in particular Governments of countries directly related to the manufacturing and production of and trade in psychotropic substances, to ratify or accede to the Convention on Psychotropic Substances of 1971, as soon as possible.

V Reduction of summary records

The Commission on Narcotic Drugs,

Recalling resolution 1379 (XLV) of the Economic and Social Council of 2 August 1968 requesting its subsidiary organs to consider dispensing with summary records,

Recognizes the need to reduce the expense of documentation;

Decides that summary records for its future sessions should be kept to a minimum; and

Further decides that the Commission will determine at the beginning of each session which agenda items are to be covered by summary records.

VI E/RES/1846(LVI) Cultivation and chewing of the coca leaf: clandestine manufacture of and illicit traffic in cocaine*

The Economic and Social Council,

Referring to the report of the International Narcotics Control Board for 1973 [ 8] and to the review of the illicit traffic in narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances during 1971 and 1972, [ 9]

Concerned over the cultivation of the coca bush, the persistence of coca-leaf chewing in the Andean region and the increased quantities of cocaine manufactured clandestinely and entering the illicit traffic,

Recallingthe relevant provisions of the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, 1961, [ 10]

Recognizing that additional measures for the control of coca-leaf production are essential in order to make possible the abolition of coca-leaf chewing and the elimination of the clandestine manufacture of cocaine,

7. E/INCB/21 (United Nations publication, Sales No.: E.74.XI.2.

8. Ibid.

9. E/CN.7/564 and Corr.1 and 2, paras 26-61.

10. United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 520, No. 7515, p. 151.

Aware of the difficulties involved in the control of coca cultivation,

Considering that the eradication of the coca bush implies the development of multi-disciplinary programmes at both the national and regional level, particularly with a view to finding substitute crops and instituting health and social action,

Considering the importance of the financial and administrative implications of the eradication of the coca bush,

Noting with satisfaction the efforts already made by some of the States concerned,

Taking account of the need to support initiatives for this purpose in order to remedy the situation,

  1. Recommends the Governments concerned to intensify measures designed to reduce coca cultivation, to eliminate the clandestine manufacture of and the illicit traffic in cocaine and, in accordance with the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, 1961, to abolish coca-leaf chewing, if possible before the expiry of the twenty-five year period provided for in article 49 of the Convention;

  2. Recommends intensification of regional co-operation by the countries concerned;

  3. Accordingly invites all States and the competent international agencies and bodies to co-operate with the Governments concerned in the search for a solution.

007

7. For the text of the Commission's resolution, see annex V.

008

8. For the text of the Council's resolution, see annex VI.