Drug Use

UNODC works to increase and improve HIV and AIDS prevention and care services for people who inject drugs in countries where the use of contaminated injecting equipment can be a major means of transmitting blood borne viruses, such as HIV. The Office works to ensure that AIDS responses are based on evidence, not ideology, and reach those most in need and most affected.

The use of contaminated injecting equipment among injecting drug users is one of the major routes of HIV transmission in many countries, contributing up to 10 per cent of all HIV transmissions worldwide and more than 30 per cent if Sub Saharan Africa is excluded. Read more...



 

Publications on HIV and Drug Use

Afghanistan: Ensuring accessibility of HIV services to women

UNAIDS REPORT

ON THE GLOBAL AIDS

EPIDEMIC | 2010


Consensus Statement of the Reference Group to the United Nations on HIV and Injecting Drug Use 2010

Independent Reference Group to the United Nations on HIV and Injecting Drug Use calls for Member States to scale up evidence-based interventions to address HIV among people who inject drugs ahead of the high level meeting on AIDS.
More in the Publications section ...

In most countries,

ensuring availability and accessibility of HIV services to women is challenging. In Afghanistan, one of the world's the most difficult and demanding development environment, making services and prevention commodities available to women and girls who use drugs demands a daily dose of courage from both the implementers and the women and girls accessing the services. Read More...