Side event to the Working Group on Trafficking in Persons:

Vienna Launch of the Framework for Action to Implement the Trafficking in Persons Protocol

Wednesday 27 January 2010, Vienna, Austria

In the margins of the Working Group on Trafficking in Persons, UNODC, along with representatives of some of the organizations having contributed to the development of the  International Framework for Action to Implement the Trafficking in Persons Protocol, launched in Vienna, the technical assistance tool aiming to support Member States in the effective implementation of the Trafficking in Persons Protocol.

The panel, chaired by Ms Doris Buddenberg, and composed of Ms Susu Thatun (UNICEF), Ms Liliana Sorrentino (OSCE), Ms Riikka Puttonen (UNODC), Ms Euridice Marquez (IOM) and Mr Fernando Garcia (OAS), focused on the practical use of the International Framework for Action addressing each of the five pillars in details.

The International Framework for Action is a technical assistance tool that supports United Nations Member States in the effective implementation of the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (United Nations Trafficking Protocol), supplementing the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (UNTOC).

Ms. Buddenburg, the Chairperson of the event, stressed that the International Framework for Action is the result of true inter-agency cooperation, combining distinct view and approaches of key organizations working in the fight against trafficking. The framework, she explained, is built on five inter-related pillars; prosecution, protection and assistance, prevention, national cooperation / coordination, and international cooperation / coordination. Each of the five panelists addressed a key pillar of this framework.

Ms. Riikka Puttonen (UNODC) addressed the prosecution pillar, noting that trafficking in persons remains a relatively under-prosecuted and under-punished crime. In this context, she stressed the need to criminalize trafficking in persons in all its forms and implement an approach to give practical effect to anti-trafficking legislation. The prosecution pillar is contained at p.17 of the International Framework for Action.

Ms. Euridice Marquez (IOM) discussed the protection pillar of the framework, underlying the need to first effectively identify victims in order to then support and assist them. She addressed the various measures that states can take in establishing an appropriate framework for assisting victims of trafficking. The protection / assistance pillar is contained at p.26 of the International Framework for Action.

Ms. Susu Thatun (UNICEF) addressed the prevention pillar of the Framework for Action, which she stressed as one of the most important aspects of effective anti-human trafficking response. Ms Thatun stressed the need to integrate preveventative approaches into broader policies related to trafficking in persons. The prevention pillar is contained at p.40 of the International Framework for Action.

Ms. Liliana Sorrentino (OSCE) addressed the national cooperation / coordination pillar of the International Framework for Action. She highlighted that the fight against trafficking requires the involvement of all sectors of society and an array of national institutions which should be coordinated in their approach so as not to duplicate efforts and waste resources.The national cooperation / coordination pillar is  contained at p.45 of the International Framework for Action.

Mr. Fernando Garcia (OAS) discussed the international cooperation / coordination approach that is necessary for a comprehensive and effective response to trafficking in persons. The often transnational nature of trafficking in persons means that the response to it must also be transnational. Mr Garcia highlighted the value of the Framework for Action in providing a basis for complementary and global action against this crime which impacts us collectively. The international cooperation / coordination pillar is contained at p.48 of the International Framework for Action.

The International Framework for Action came about as a result of the Government of France requesting that UNODC provide its support and expertise to analyze all aspects of existing national and regional anti-human trafficking policy and coordination mechanisms in order to support improved implementation of the Trafficking in Persons Protocol. UNODC undertook a desk review of existing instruments, strategies and plans of action (both national and regional) to combat trafficking in persons. It has also reviewed Member States' reports on the implementation of the Trafficking in Persons Protocol and reports of the Chief Executives Board on the role of the United Nations entities and other relevant organizations. The International Framework for Action to Implement the Trafficking in Persons Protocol is the result of intense inter-agency cooperation efforts by the following organizations, thus ensuring a comprehensive approach: UNHCR, UNICEF, UNICRI, UNIFEM, ILO, IOM, OHCHR, OSCE, OAS, ECPAT, Anti-Slavery, Johns Hopkins University, Terre des Hommes International Federation, LEFÖ.

Expertise was provided in the course of consultations and meetings by anti-trafficking partners including Anti-Slavery International, Council of Europe, End child prostitution, child pornography and trafficking of children for sexual purposes (ECPAT), International Organization for Migration (IOM), International Labour Organization (ILO), Intervention Centre for Victims of Trafficking in Women (LEFOE-IBF), Organization of American States (OAS), Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), Terre des homes International Federation (Tdh), The Protection Project, Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies,United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women/Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDAW/DESA), United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI), United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).

The International Framework for Action was also launched in New York on 9 October 2009. For more information, visit our News and Events page.

Read more about the International Framework for Action and other anti-trafficking tools and publications here.