Special events

Media Relations and Good Practices in Anti-Corruption Awareness Raising Campaigns

Al Majlis room, 10 November 2009

The event will provide anti-corruption practitioners and specialized agencies with an opportunity to share lessons learned on techniques for establishing collaborative relationships with the media. Establishing such relationships would contribute to the work of anti-corruption agencies, recognizing the ability of the media to act as a watchdog, agenda-setter and gatekeeper. Strengthening ties with the media would also allow accurate information on corruption and efforts to tackle it to reach the public, whose support is key to anti-corruption agencies' long-term success. The second part of the event will review a selection of good practices in anti-corruption campaigns waged by member states and civil society in order to inform future corruption prevention work. Case studies will be presented, followed by discussions on how successful anti-corruption campaigns have helped to generate awareness and increase societies' intolerance of corruption. Follow-up activities to this event will include the development of practical training tools (guides and manuals) for the anti-corruption community, such as an easy-to-use advocacy guide for non-governmental organizations implementing anti-corruption strategies.

For additional information, please contact:

Ms. Luciana Viegas

Associate Expert

Advocacy Section

United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime

E-mail: luciana.viegas@unodc.org (send e-mail)

 

Forum for Parliamentarians: Working with others

Al Maha room, 10 November 2009

 

The Forum will address the theme of how parliamentarians may draw on the expertise and support of international agencies active in the fight against corruption. As in previous forums, a declaration is expected to be issued, outlining how parliamentarians working with others can support the implementation of the United Nations Convention against Corruption, with special attention being paid to preventing corruption and ensuring a transparent review of the Convention's implementation. The policy positions adopted, in 2008, at the Third Global Conference of Parliamentarians against Corruption will be used to help participants develop a plan of action for parliamentarians.

Draft agenda

Final Declaration

For additional information, please contact:

Ms. Nola Juraitis

Secretary

Global Task Force on the United Nations Convention against Corruption

Global Organization of Parliamentarians against Corruption

E-mail: nolajur@sympatico.ca (send e-mail)

 

Fostering Public-Private Partnerships in the Fight against Corruption

Al Basir room, 10 November 2009

During the past decade, international efforts to counter corruption have been strengthened by to the entry into force of major international conventions (notably, the United Nations Convention against Corruption and the Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). While a large number of States have ratified those conventions, public sector enforcement and national implementation are a work in progress. With some notable exceptions, the private sector has also been slow in engaging in the fight against corruption. Also, many Governments are neither fully aware of positive self-regulatory efforts undertaken by the business community, nor have they come to fully appreciate the contribution that business can make to changing the climate in which corruption occurs.

The Basel Institute on Governance, the International Development Law Organization and the World Economic Forum Partnering Against Corruption Initiative have partnered to strengthen the role of public-private cooperation in the fight against corruption. The event seeks to identify ways to provide incentives for the private sector to engage in the fight against corruption by implementing anti-corruption programmes. Opportunities to be explored are:

1. Diverse approaches: (a) sector-specific; (b) at the micro-level, e.g. within corporate structures; or (c) at the macro-level, e.g. institution building.

2. Means to facilitate public and private engagement, particularly in most vulnerable areas. Facilitation of public-private activities, such as, fiscal incentives for research, training and awareness-raising. Partnering ventures like joint implementation of "integrity trusts", integrity tools and instruments (e.g. "report and score card surveys and endorsements" such as awards, merits of recognition and seals).

3. Public policy approaches, such as implementation of mandatory provisions of the United Nations Convention against Corruption, procurement rules, tax breaks and export credit agencies.

The panel will also discuss: (a) the types of corruption most prevalent and with the highest impact on the private sector; (b) how public and private sectors elect to collaborate in anti-corruption reform; (c) possible scope of private sector engagement; and (d) how to ensure a level playing field for everyone in the private sector to guarantee fair competition without corruption.

With the support of its partners, the International Development Law Organization has undertaken research to identify public policy options to provide incentives to private sector anti-corruption efforts. The panel will present and discuss the research methodology and the first results of this joint project.

 

Moderator:
Huguette Labelle, Chair, Transparency International

1. H.E. Mr Jorge Hage Sobrinho, Minister of State, Office of the
Comptroller General of Brazil (CGU) (Brasília, Brazil)
2. Michael Pedersen, Associate Director, World Economic Forum; Head of
Partnering Against Corruption Initiative (PACI)
3. Thomas McInerney, Director of Research, Policy, and Strategic
Initiatives, International Development Law Organization (IDLO)
4. Anne Lugon-Moulin, Co-Executive Director, Basel Institute on Governance

 

For additional information, please contact:

Mr. Michael Pedersen

Associate Director, Global Leadership Fellow, World Economic Forum

Head, World Economic Forum Partnering Against Corruption Initiative

Council Manager, Global Agenda Council on Corruption

E-mail: michael.pedersen@weforum.org (send e-mail)

 

Income and Asset Declarations: Tools and Trade-offs

Al Rayan room, 10 November 2009

 

At this event, the Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative (StAR) and the World Bank Actionable Governance Indicators - Public Accountability Mechanism (AGI-PAM) Initiative will present the consultation draft of the "Income and Asset Declarations: Tools and Trade-offs." A resource for income and asset declarations practitioners and policy makers, the study provides practical advice and options for countries who want to build effective asset disclosure mechanisms that to prevent, uncover, and prosecute asset theft. The study recognizes asset declarations as an important element of building successful anti-corruption programs and its role in creating a culture of integrity in public service. Designed primarily as a practical tool, the study provides quick-reference text highlighting good practices in core areas, such as management and accountability, compliance, and verification. The study analyzes the legal framework of disclosure systems in 87 countries and presents findings from, consultations with practitioners, as well as eight in-depth case studies and an analysis of reforms in two fragile states.

 

For additional information, please contact:

Ms. Ruxandra Burdescu

Public Sector Specialist

Public Sector and Governance, World Bank

E-mail: rburdescu@worldbank.org (send e-mail)

 

 

Challenges in Making Asset Recovery Effective

Al Maha room, 11 November 2009

The panel will support the ongoing debate on asset recovery, exploring technical and non-technical challenges faced by asset recovery actors.The discussion will address the following questions:

  • What are the challenges, domestic and international, from a requesting State's point of view?
  • What are the challenges, domestic and international, from a requested State's point of view?
  • What are the financial implications?

 

For additional information, please contact:

Ms. Andrea Poelling

Head of Resources and Operational Support

Basel Institute on Governance

E-mail: andrea.poelling@baselgovernance.org (send e-mail)

 

Civil Society Organizations Forum

Al Majlis room, 11 November 2009

The forum will address the following themes:

  • Role of civil society and transparency in the fight against corruption, pursuant to article 13 of the United Nations Convention against Corruption
  • Transparency and participation of civil society organizations in monitoring the Convention against Corruption
  • Transparency and participation of civil society organizations in the pilot programme for reviewing the Convention against Corruption
  • Preventive measures in the Convention against Corruption for public and private sector integrity
  • Money-laundering, asset recovery and tax havens
  • Tole of corruption in trafficking in persons

 

For additional information, please contact:

Ms. Gillian Dell

Programme Manager, Conventions

Transparency International

E-mail: gdell@transparency.org (send e-mail)

 

Towards a Global Architecture for Asset Recovery

Al Maha Room, 11 November 2009

In recent years, there has been progress in developing the institutional and legal structures to support asset recovery. The asset recovery agenda also enjoys high-level political support. Most recently the G-20 leaders at the Pittsburgh Summit in September 2009 highlighted the importance of asset recovery with a commitment to secure the return of assets stolen from developing countries and support efforts to stem illicit outflows. The challenge now is to deliver results: to bring asset recovery cases to court, achieve successful judgments, and secure asset returns. At this event, StAR will introduce a consultative draft of " Towards a Global Architecture for Asset Recovery". The study is a call to action which lays out some of the measures that national authorities and international bodies can undertake to accelerate the pace of asset return. The intention of this session is to inform and stimulate the debate on how goodwill around asset recovery will be translated into concrete results.

 

For additional information, please contact:

Mr. Adrian Fozzard

Coordinator, StAR initiative

World Bank

E-mail: afozzard@worldbank.org (send e-mail)

 

Meeting of the Global Task Force on the United Nations Convention against Corruption of the Global Organization of Parliamentarians Against Corruption

Al Basir Room, 11 November 2009

 

For additional information, please contact:

Ms. Nola Juraitis

Secretary

Global Task Force on the United Nations Convention against Corruption

Global Organization of Parliamentarians against Corruption

E-mail: nolajur@sympatico.ca (send e-mail)

 

Briefing on the first International Anti-Corruption Academy (IACA)

Al Maha room, 11 November 2009

New types of cross-border crime are facilitating corruption, such as financial crime, which cannot be solved with traditional methods alone.


INTERPOL, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Republic of Austria, with the strong support of the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF), have agreed to create the first global International Anti-Corruption Academy (IACA) to transfer knowledge and skills to those engaged in the prevention, detection and prosecution of corruption, and to help to enhance transparency and implement the UN Convention against Corruption (UNCAC). The Academy, the first of its kind, expects to start operating in the autumn of 2010 and will eventually become an international organization. This briefing by the principal partners and experts will explain how this innovative institution will professionalize anti-corruption work and improve the effectiveness of those who work in the front-line against corruption.

Speakers:

Ambassador Helmut Böck, Austria

Mr. Franz-Hermann Brüner, Director-General, OLAF

Mr. Martin Kreutner, Director, Chair of the IACA Steering Committee

Mr. Michael Olmsted, Head of the IACA Transition Team and Director, Interpol

Mr. John Sandage, Deputy Director, Division for Treaty Affairs, Chief, Treaty and Legal Assistance Branch, and Officer-in-Charge, Terrorism Prevention Branch, UNODC

Ambassador Muhyieddeen Touq, Jordan

 

For additional information, please contact:

Ms. Preeta Bannerjee

Communications Officer,

IACA Transition Team

E-mail: preeta.bannerjee@unodc.org (send e-mail)

 

Politically Exposed Persons (PEPs): Recommendations and Best Practices for Creating Effective PEP Detection and Monitoring Systems.

Al Majlis Room, 12 November 2009

 

UNCAC recognizes that implementing an effective PEPs regime is critical to preventing and detecting the movement of corruption proceeds, and thus integral to the asset recovery agenda. Article 52 requires Member States to "conduct enhanced scrutiny of accounts sought or maintained by or on behalf of individuals who are, or have been, entrusted with prominent public functions and their family members and associates." At this session, the Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative (StAR) will introduce " Stolen Asset Recovery: Politically Exposed Persons - A Policy Paper on Strengthening Preventive Measures," a knowledge product designed to help build regimes that can manage potential risks posed by PEPs and prevent PEPs from abusing domestic and international financial systems to launder proceeds of crime and corruption. The session will address the key recommendations and best practices outlined in the paper, particularly those aimed at improving compliance with international standards that indentify and monitor PEPs and strengthening implementation by supervisory authorities and banks.

 

For additional information, please contact:

Mr. Theodore Greenberg

Financial Sector Specialist

Financial market Integrity Unit, World Bank

E-mail: tgreenberg@worldbank.org (send e-mail)

 

or

 

Ms. Larissa Gray

Financial Sector Specialist

Financial market Integrity Unit, World Bank

E-mail: lgray@worldbank.org (send e-mail)