December 1, 2017

Education for Justice:   Vincenza Nazzari, Equitas International Center for Human Rights Education

The Education for Justice (E4J) initiative seeks to prevent crime and promote a culture of lawfulness through education activities designed for primary, secondary and tertiary levels. We spoke to Vincenza Nazzari from Equitas International Center for Human Rights Education, to get her thoughts on the role of education based on the rule of law in shaping the value of future generations.

November 6, 2017

The Zorbs - An Introduction

UNODC's Education for Justice (E4J) initiative is working to build a culture of lawfulness among children and youth on topics related to criminal justice, crime prevention and the rule of law. At the primary school level, this focuses on promoting and teaching values such as acceptance, fairness, integrity and respect among 6 to 12 year olds.

October 3, 2017

Education for Justice: Yuliya Zabyelina, Assistant Professor, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Under the Doha Declaration Global Programme, UNODC is developing a series of modules to help better teach on mandated issues in universities. Part of the Education for Justice (E4J) initiative, this covers topics such as transnational organized crime, money laundering, corruption, and terrorism - among many others. To find out more, we talked to Yuliya Zabyelina, Assistant Professor, John Jay College of Criminal Justice about the importance of the Sustainable Development Goals as crime prevention tool.

October 3, 2017

Education for Justice: Katja Samuel, Global Security and Disaster Management Ltd

Under the Doha Declaration Global Programme, UNODC is developing a series of modules to help better teach on mandated issues in universities. Part of the Education for Justice (E4J) initiative, this covers topics such as transnational organized crime, money laundering, corruption, and terrorism - among many others. To find out more, we asked Katja Samuel, Global Security and Disaster Management Ltd about the importance of education in countering terrorist propaganda.

October 3, 2017

Education for Justice: Gabriella Sanchez, Reasearch Fellow, Migration Policy Centre

Under the Doha Declaration Global Programme, UNODC is developing a series of modules to help better teach on mandated issues in universities. Part of the Education for Justice (E4J) initiative, this covers topics such as transnational organized crime, money laundering, corruption, and terrorism - among many others. To find out more, we asked Gabriella Sanchez, Reasearch Fellow, Migration Policy Centre about the causes behind migrant smuggling.

October 3, 2017

Education for Justice: Chat Le Nguyen, Assistant Professor in Law, Fiji National University

Under the Doha Declaration Global Programme, UNODC is developing a series of modules to help better teach on mandated issues in universities. Part of the Education for Justice (E4J) initiative, this covers topics such as transnational organized crime, money laundering, corruption, and terrorism - among many others. To find out more, we spoke with Chat Le Nguyen from Fiji National University about the role of education in crime prevention as part of the organized crime modules.

September 27, 2017

Education for Justice: Jay Albanese, Professor and Criminologist, Virginia Commonwealth University

Under the Doha Declaration Global Programme, UNODC is developing a series of modules to help better teach on mandated issues in universities. Part of the Education for Justice (E4J) initiative, this covers topics such as transnational organized crime, money laundering, corruption, and terrorism - among many others. To find out more, we spoke with Prof. Jay Albanese from the Virginia Commonwealth University about the role of education in crime prevention as part of the organized crime modules.

September 26, 2017

Education for Justice: Neil Boister, Professor of Law, University of Canterbury

Under the Doha Declaration Global Programme, UNODC is developing university modules which cover topics such as transnational organized crime, money laundering, corruption, and terrorism. We spoke with Neil Boister, Professor of Law, University of Canterbury about the legal elements of transnational organized crime groups.