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Special events

During the seventh session of the Conference of the States Parties to the United Nations Convention against Corruption in Vienna, Austria, 6 to 10 November 2017, 48 on-site special events will be held at the Vienna International Centre, organized by Governments, Departments and Agencies of the United Nations, Intergovernmental and Non-Governmental Organizations and UNODC.
Please see below the Programme of the on-site Special Events. [Click on the event's title for more information]:

 

Events Calendar
       

Monday, 6 November 2017

14.00-15.15
Conference Room M3

Putting the Marrakech declaration on the prevention of corruption into practice : implementing robust anti-corruption frameworks and bodies

Organizer: France

This side event, jointly organized by France and Morocco, discussed concrete examples of tools, strategic approaches and “best practices” concerning the prevention of corruption, with special reference to the experience of France and Morocco in implementing the Marrakech Declaration, adopted by the Annual Conference of the International Association of Anti-Corruption Authorities, held in Morocco, in October 2011, and formally adopted by the Conference of the States Parties. The opening remarks by UNODC Executive Director Mr. Yury Fedotov were followed by statements from high-level representatives from France and Morocco, notably Mr. Mohammed Benabdelkader, Minister Delegate to the Head of Government in charge of Public Service and Administration Modernization, Morocco; Mr. Abdellatif Mouatadid, Director of Support, Central Authority for Corruption Prevention, Morocco; H.E. Mr. Jean-Claude Brunet, Special Representative for the Fight against Transnational Crime and Illicit Trafficking of Small Arms and Light Weapons, France; and Mr. Charles Duchaine, Director of the French Anti-Corruption Agency, France. The French Anti-Corruption Agency is a new organization created by the law of 9 December 2016 on transparency, the fight against corruption and the modernization of economic life. Ms. Candice Welsch, Chief of the Implementation Support Section of the UNODC Corruption and Economic Crime Branch also presented at the penal. The penal was moderated by H.E. Mr. Jean-Louis Falconi, Permanent Representative of France to the United Nations Office and International Organizations in Vienna. The discussion highlighted the importance of the Marakkech declaration as it guided the work of UNODC and in particular the Intergovernmental Working Group of Prevention and set the standards for effective anti-corruption strategies to inform national efforts for corruption prevention.

The discussion focused on the need of strengthening national and international prevention mechanism to combat corruption, of involving and strengthening the capacity of civil society and the private sector to participate in the prevention of corruption, the role of education for promoting a culture of integrity, and the need for transparency and good governance in public administration and public service delivery, in particular in regards to access to information, code of conducts and systems to manage conflicts of interest. International best practices underlined the need of sufficient financial and human resources and for inter-agency coordination for effective anti-corruption bodies and anti-corruption strategies.

For additional information, please contact:

Tiphaine Chapeau,
First Secretary,
Permanent Mission of France to the United Nations (Vienna), tiphaine.chapeau@diplomatie.gouv.fr

Assistant: Ms. Elodie Schmitt, elodie.schmidt@diplomatie.gouv.fr

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13.30-15.00
Conference Room M6

Understanding the links between corruption and violent extremism

Organizer: UNODC-ROSEN

Around the world, violent extremism has taken the lives of thousands of innocent people in recent years. While security responses are necessary, preventive measures also need to address the deeper causes and enablers of violent extremism. This session will share new research undertaken by UNDP, UNODC and other actors about the links between corruption and violent extremism in Asia, the Sahel region and beyond.

For additional information, please contact:

Aida Arutyunova, UNDP Anti-Corruption Specialist
Bureau for Policy and Programme Support
Anti-Corruption for Peaceful and Inclusive Societies (ACPIS project)
aida.arutyunova@undp.org

Jeffery Bawa
Regional Office for West and Central Africa (ROSEN)
jeffery.bawa@unodc.org

Flyer:
English
French

Agenda:

Presentations:
Mirella Dummar Frahi, UNODC

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13.30-15.00
Conference Room M7

The elephant in the room: Addressing corruption linked to wildlife crime

Organizer: UNODC

Wildlife, forestry and fisheries crime is reported to be the fourth most lucrative form of organized crime. The profits made by the criminals are dwarfed by the losses to communities and countries, both financial and environmental. The impact on security and development also undermines the rule of law and governance structures. Those tasked with the management of wildlife, forestry and fishery resources know that corruption is a major driver of these crimes. This event, led by the Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime and the Secretary General of the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species is a call for action. If efforts to protect the World's flora and fauna are to succeed then the anti-corruption community must engage now. This workshop will highlight how anti-corruption interventions can reduce wildlife, forestry and fisheries crime and provide guidelines for the anti-corruption community to become more active in this area.

For additional information, please contact:

Tim Steele
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch
UNODC
tim.steele@unodc.org

Agenda:

Presentations:

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15.30-17.00
Conference Room M3

UNCAC and integrity, transparency and anti-corruption preventive policies

Organizer: Qatar

The State of Qatar, jointly with Ecuador and the Republic of Kiribati, organized the special event “UNCAC and integrity, transparency and anti-corruption preventive policies.” The event focused on the importance of effective and coordinated national anti-corruption policies in the implementation of UNCAC. Panelists discussed experiences and best practices in using the UNCAC review mechanism as a guide to developing such policies as well as using UNCAC to identify goals, outputs and outcomes for their implementation. In addition, the event discussed the experiences of Qatar, Kiribati and Ecuador in developing national anti-corruption strategies, using UNCAC as a framework for analysis and development of the strategies, and the role of these strategies in the implementation of UNCAC in those States. The event was chaired by H.E. Saad AlMahmoud, President of the Administrative Control and Transparency Authority of Qatar. The speakers included H.E. Taneti Mamau, the President of the Republic of Kiribati, H.E. Mrs. Rosana Alvarado, Minister of Justice and Human Rights of Ecuador, Mr. Patrick Keuleers, Director of Governance and Peacebuilding at the United Nations Development Programme, and Mr. Jason Reichelt of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.

For additional information, please contact:

Administrative Control and Transparency Authority,
internationalrelations@acta.gov.qa

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15.30-17.00
Conference Room M6

Fostering partnerships to fast-track UNCAC implementation

Organizer: UK

Following up commitments made at the London Anti-Corruption Summit in 2016, to promote fast-tracking UNCAC implementation, the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office and UNODC decided to promote a set of concrete activities in East Africa and Southeast Asia. The two regions present a large number of gaps in implementing UNCAC but also a dynamic environment for reforms. The engagement in these regions started with two regional events, organized in early 2017 with the aim of designing a road map to address effectively the most evident gaps in the implementation of UNCAC. Practitioners and experts from the two regions, in particular Justice Irene Mulyagonja, Inspector-General of the Government of Uganda; Mr. Wong Hong Kuan, Director of the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau, Singapore; Mr. Kittita Wasinondh, National Legislative Assembly Member, Thailand; Ms. Jackline Were, Chapter Coordinator, Transparency International Kenya; and Ms. Alison Crocket, Head of the Anti-Corruption and Transparency Team, Economic Diplomacy Directorate, UK FCO presented the most important areas that need to be addressed and debated the challenges and way forward. The panel was moderated by Mr. Tim Steele, Senior Adviser for Anti-Corruption, UNODC. Common challenges across regions identified by the panelists include gaps in national legislation, lack of capacity, inter-agency coordination, international cooperation, effective implementation of access to information laws, financial investigations, systems to manage conflicts of interest and asset declarations, whistle-blower protection and public procurement. The need to cooperate and share information across borders to effectively implement UNCAC and address corruption was highlighted. Forming broad-based coalitions across multiple stakeholders and including civil society in addressing corruption was also discussed.

For additional information, please contact:

Ian Tennant,
UK Mission,
ian.tennant@fco.gov.uk

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15.30-17.00
Conference Room M7

Role of citizen engagement in fighting against corruption

Organizer: Government of Mexico

In the course of this event, the role of the civil society in the fight against corruption was explored. The participants in the event, including representatives of both the public sector and civil society from Mexico, Chile, Brazil and Colombia, as well as high level representatives of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime shared their experiences, views and best practices from their countries and institutions.

The challenges before the actions of the civil society to prevent and fight corruption were underlined, including the uneven coverage of the territories of the countries and the capacity limitations of the civil society organizations.

The participants also emphasized the importance of looking at governance as a process where decision-making is shared with society. Mr. Roberto Arbitrio, Chief of Staff and Officer in Charge of the Division of Operations underlined the importance UNODC attaches to promoting participation of society in the anti-corruption work.

For additional information, please contact:

Gonzalo Cervera Martinez
Permanent Mission of Mexico
gcervera@sre.gob.mx

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Nicolás Lagos

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Tuesday, 7 November 2017

9.00-17.30
Conference Room M3

Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative (StAR) Day

Organizer: StAR

This special event, organized by the World Bank/UNODC Stolen Asset Recovery (StAR) Initiative and other partners, provides a platform for StAR, its partners, practitioners and other stakeholders to engage in discussions over various topics related to asset recovery, present new tools, studies and solutions and outline the challenges and expectations for the future.

09.00-10.30: A High-level Conversation on Asset Recovery: Achievements, Challenges and the Road Ahead
In a conversation, high-level officials from around the world examine the asset recovery landscape and the lessons learned and discuss policies that can help to overcome the obstacles in the process of tracing and returning proceeds of corruption.
For additional information, please contact:
Shervin Majlessi,
Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative (StAR),
Senior Financial Sector Specialist/Senior Legal Adviser,
smajlessi@worldbank.org

10.45-12.15: Guidelines for the Efficient Recovery of Stolen Assets: Launch of an Online Tool
The guidelines and their corresponding steps of action constitute a set of international good practices aimed at improving the efficiency of requesting and requested States in the asset recovery process. They were developed by experts from around 30 requested and requesting States and international organizations following the Lausanne seminars.
After an introduction, four experts will discuss how the guidelines help to overcome difficulties in the asset recovery process.

For additional information, please contact:
Daniela Haenggi
Federal Department of Foreign affairs FDFA
Directorate of International Law DIL
Task Force Asset Recovery
daniela.haenggi@eda.admin.ch

12.15-13.15: What Are the New Resources in Asset Recovery?
This session will showcase ongoing work carried out by StAR, UNODC and other partners on new resources, tools, and knowledge products made available to practitioners and policymakers, including international and regional practitioner networks which provide platforms that can complement and facilitate cooperation in advance of the mutual legal assistance process.
For additional information, please contact:
Shervin Majlessi,
Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative (StAR)
Senior Financial Sector Specialist/Senior Legal Adviser
smajlessi@worldbank.org

13.30-15.00: Best Practices on Asset Management
This session will feature a panel discussion on good practices states parties have implemented in the management and disposal of recovered assets. Panellists will share their countries’ experiences on effective tools utilized to identify assets for confiscation and to preserve assets seized and/or frozen while awaiting final judicial action. Panellists will also explore challenges encountered in the development of an asset management regime.
For additional information, please contact:
Teresa Turner-Jones
United States Department of Justice
Money Laundering and Asset Recovery Section
Teresa.Turner@usdoj.gov

15.30-17.00: Civil Society Discussion: The Role of Civil Society in Asset Recovery
This panel will look at the role that civil society can play in overcoming challenges in the asset recovery process. In particular, it will look at the following:
1. Ways in which CSOs from developing and developed countries can collaborate to uncover the money trail of stolen wealth, investigate where stolen wealth has been hidden, such as in properties in developed countries, and in banks in developed countries or offshore;
2. Ways in which relationships can be developed and improved between CSOs and government and CSOs and law enforcement, to improve both the policy-legal framework for asset recovery and to improve the flow of relevant information to law enforcement that may enhance asset recovery cases as well as ensuring that perpetrators of corruption and facilitators of corrupt wealth are held to account;
3. Ways in which CSOs can play a role in highlighting the impact of corruption and the harm done by corrupt acts to ensure that courts and prosecutors take account of this in setting high standards for compensation of victims;
4. Ways in which CSOs can help monitor returned assets to ensure that they are used in a transparent and accountable way that benefits the victims of corruption.
The panel will include speakers from both government and civil society, and will aim to look at examples of best practice for each of the areas mentioned above where civil society can and does contribute to enhancing the asset recovery process.
For additional information, please contact:
Juanita Olaya,
UNCAC Coalition,
juanitaolaya@gmail.com

17.00-17.30: Concluding Remarks: What Is Next for Global Asset Recovery Agenda?
For additional information, please contact
Shervin Majlessi,
Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative (StAR)
Senior Financial Sector Specialist/Senior Legal Adviser
smajlessi@worldbank.org

Agenda:

Presentations:

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9.00-10.30
Conference Room M6

Judicial integrity and the prevention of corruption in the justice sector

Organizer: UNODC

Jointly with the German Development Cooperation, UNODC organised a special event on Judicial Integrity and the Prevention of Corruption in the Justice Sector. The event debated the impact of Article 11 of the UNCAC and the Bangalore Principles of Judicial Conduct, and analysed what remained to be done by various stakeholders to achieve full implementation of these global standards. Against this backdrop participants discussed how the Global Judicial Integrity Network, which is proposed to be launched by UNODC in 2018, might best support judiciaries and other justice sector stakeholders in their endeavours to uphold and strengthen judicial integrity and prevent corruption in the justice sector.

For additional information, please contact:

Oliver Stolpe,
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch,
UNODC,
oliver.stolpe@unodc.org

Marcus Zamaitat,
GIZ,
Marcus.Zamaitat@giz.de

Flyer:
English

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Oliver Stolpe
Tilman Hoppe

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9.00-10.30
Conference Room M7

Integrity of counter narcotics and justice sector institutions: the role of anti-corruption measures in the effective fight against drug trafficking & organized crime

Organizer: UNODC

Integrity, accountability and resilience against the influences and threats from organised crime groups are essential to ensure that law enforcement units working on drug-trafficking and related offences, can carry out their work effectively. If those elements are not in place or not put into practice, the detection, investigation and prosecution of offences might be jeopardized. The impact can be felt at the national level, but also across borders where criminal networks operate across countries or continents. Many initiatives supporting the fight against trafficking of drugs and contraband have not yet analysed and addressed corruption risks more comprehensively. Law enforcement agencies and officers working on drug related and organised crime though, need dedicated training and support systems due to their exposed position.

The special event held at the margins of the Conference outlined approaches on institutional integrity implemented under the CRIMJUST project (2016-2020), which is focusing on several countries along the Cocaine Route across Latin America, the Caribbean and West Africa. In addition, the event showcased how civil society can support criminal justice institutions in the assessment of vulnerability to corruption and help in the development of mitigating measures or advocacy for more resources and political support. The special event provided expert input as well as room for conversation and debate, highlighting the critical issues and promoting active knowledge exchange between participants. It aimed at increasing awareness in the anti-corruption community, supporting exchange of experiences and advocate for more financial support from donors.

The panellists from the Organised Crime Branch and the Corruption and Economic Crime Branch of UNODC presented activities which had been carried, in particular under the CRIMJUST project, which focuses on three areas, capacity building of criminal justice actors, regional and interregional cooperation between criminal justice institutions, and institutional integrity. In the first year of implementation 44 capacity building activities had been carried out, reaching 1202 participants.

The panellists from Transparency International concluded with a presentation on ways how civil society organisations under CRIMJUST support the objective of strengthening integrity and accountability of justice institutions and ending impunity. During the first year of implementation, an assessment tool, the Criminal Justice Dashboard, had been developed to assess criminal justice institutions in regard to seven areas: Internal and external oversight, protections, transparency, civil society participation, capacity and independence.

Summary Report

For additional information, please contact:

Constanze von Soehnen
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch
UNODC (CRIMJUST Project)
Constanze.vonsoehnen@unodc.org

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9.00-14.30
Press Room

Consultation Workshop on UN Global Compact's Action Platform on Justice and Strong Institutions

Organizer: UN Global Compact

Organized during the Conference of the State Parties to the UN Convention Against Corruption on Tuesday 7 November in Vienna, the Consultation Workshop will convene representatives from the private sector, UN, governments and civil society to engage in interactive discussions which will help inform the vision for UN Global Compact's Action Platform on Justice and Strong Institutions which will be launched in 2018.

The Workshop will be followed by a thematic session organized by the UN Global Compact and UN Office on Drugs and Crime, in collaboration with GSK, on the ways in which the private sector, acting collectively with the public sector and the UN, is promoting transparency and reducing corruption risks through the use of innovative solutions such as collective action and e-government techniques, and supporting local implementation to drive impact on the ground.how the private sector is finding innovative ways to support anti-corruption efforts at the global and local level.

This event is restricted to members of the UN Global Compact delegation.

For additional information, please contact:

Neha Das,
UN Global Compact,
das@unglobalcompact.org

Agenda:

Presentations:

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13.30-15.00
Conference Room M4

Good practices in CSO engagement in the UNCAC Review Mechanism: governmental and CSO perspectives

Organizer: UNODC CST

The special event organised by the UNODC Civil Society Team (CST), brought together and demonstrated successful partnerships between States Parties and members of civil society organisations (CSOs) in fighting corruption. Panellists further spoke about joint efforts undertaken before, during and after both cycles of the review of implementation of the United Nations Convention against Corruption. Two pairings of governments and CSOs, from Mauritius and Bosnia and Herzegovina respectively, discussed good practices in CSO engagement in the review process. The presentation by Bosnia and Herzegovina was delivered by a representative from the Agency for the Prevention of Corruption and Coordination of the Fight against Corruption, while the corresponding CSO presentation was given by the Bosnia and Herzegovina chapter of Transparency International. The Mauritius experience was presented by the Independent Commission against Corruption, together with the Civil Society Network against Corruption representing the civil society perspective. Furthermore, the UNCAC Coalition to launched the Africa Anti-Corruption Regional Platform at the event. The platform is the result of a proposal by UNODC and disseminates information about UNCAC-related initiatives of African CSOs including other stakeholders working in the anti-corruption field. The platform also facilitates the exchange of information and collaboration among CSOs in the region.

For additional information, please contact:

Lindy Muzila
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch
UNODC
lindy.muzila@unodc.org

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13.30-15.00
Conference Room M6

Experiences of States parties in making use of best practices suggested under the CoSP and its subsidiary bodies

Organizer: Saudi Arabia

The National Anti-Corruption Commission of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia organized a special side event on the experiences of States parties in making use of best practices suggested under the framework of the CoSP and its subsidiary bodies. The event brought together experts and participants to discuss how to most effectively put into practice the recommendations and best practices raised during the UNCAC meetings by translating outcomes into action.

The discussion also focused on the impact of the Review Mechanism, and how the peer review exercise has helped to identify gaps and shortcomings in anti-corruption frameworks, and the Mechanism’s overall positive impact on national efforts to fight corruption. The event was moderated by Mr. John Brandolino, Director of the Division for Treaty Affairs, UNODC. Presentations were delivered by H.E. Dr. Bandar Abaalkhail, Vice President of the Anti-Corruption Commission of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (NAZAHA), and Ms. Nan Fife, Senior Foreign Service Officer from the United States Permanent Mission in Vienna.

The event presented a unique opportunity for States parties to share their national experiences and internal coordination mechanisms to advance anti-corruption efforts.

For additional information, please contact:

Mohammed Alkahtani
Legal Specialist
The National Anti-Corruption Commission (Nazaha) Saudi Arabia,
E-Mail: Malkahtani@Nazaha.gov.sa

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13.30-15.00
Conference Room M7

The Brazilian experience in fighting corruption through leniency programmes and plea agreements and its impacts in Latin America

Organizer: Brazilian Prosecution Service

Ms Monica Garcia, Head of the Brazilian Anti-Corruption Chamber, and Denise Neves Abade, Brazilian Federal Circuit Prosecutor, delivered an informative presentation concerning the impact of plea agreements and leniency agreements on the investigation and prosecution of corruption in Brazil. Introducing the speakers and moderating the discussion was Costa Palicarsky, Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Officer with UNODC. The presentation had a practical focus, examining in depth the impact of plea and leniency agreements on two large-scale corruption investigations. The agreements are regarded by the Brazilian authorities primarily as important investigative tools, since they often lead to defendants cooperating with the authorities. This is frequently by way of providing information about broader (often transnational) criminal networks, of which they form part. In this respect the agreements are seen as crucial in the fight against transnational organised corruption. Without such cooperation, the true extent of international corrupt activity in such cases is otherwise often difficult to establish.

Interestingly, as part of an agreement, a defendant will often be required to engage in social projects which are restorative in nature. This is in addition to the financial penalties and corporate restructuring which form a central part of many such agreements.

The discussion centered around two issues; the limits of such plea agreements and whether they interfered with due process; and the transnational sharing of intelligence arising from the cooperation provided by defendants in these cases.

For additional information, please contact:

Geórgia Diogo,
Brazilian Prosecution Service,
georgiadiogo@mpf.mp.br

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14.30-16.00
Press Room

Advancing anti-corruption and transparency through private sector initiatives

Organizer: GSK

The special event was organized by UN Global Compact and UNODC in collaboration with GSK. The event discussed ways in which the private sector, in collaboration with public sector and the UN, is promoting transparency and reducing corruption risks through the use of innovative solutions such as collective action, e-government techniques and supporting local implementation to drive impact on the ground. The event focused on recent private sector initiatives on anti-corruption matters. It showcased new collective actions and innovative compliance measures, in areas as diverse as use of e-government mechanisms, small and medium sized enterprises, state owned enterprises, and public-private partnerships. Speakers included Gemma Aiolfi, Basel Institute on Governance (Facilitator), Yujing Yue of UNODC, Bo Mathiasen, Head of UNODC’s Colombia Country Office, Andrew Daniels, Head of Anti-Bribery and Corruption Centre of Excellence at GlaxoSmithKline and Qusay Salama, Project Director of Integrity Network Initiative and member of the Egyptian Junior Business Association.

For additional information, please contact:

Gonzalo Guzman,
GlaxoSmithKline (GSK),
gonzalo.x.guzman@gsk.com

Agenda:

Presentations:
Bo Mathiasen

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15.30-17.00
Conference Room M6

Panama’s work on ethics & anti-corruption online training for public sector officials

Organizer: Panama

The event will focus on Panama’s efforts to prevent corruption by increasing the knowledge on applicable ethics principles among civil servants across all public institutions in the country. The representative of the National Authority for Transparency and Access to Information will present the recently launched E-learning Course “Basic Training on Ethics for Civil Servants” based in the International Code of Conduct for Public Officials that inspires the Panamanian Uniform Code of Ethics.

For additional information, please contact:

Cristina Ritter / Ms. Angelika Maytin,
ANTAI, Panama,
Cristina.ritter@unodc.org (on behalf of ANTAI, Ms. Angélika Maytin)

Virginia De Abajo Marques,
UNODC ROPAN
virginia.deabajo-marques@unodc.org

Agenda:

Presentations:

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16.30-18.00
Conference Room M7

Briefing on the latest progress by China to combat corruption

Organizer: China

This side event will focus on the lastest development and progress fo China's fight against corruption. The speakers will also share China's practice to implement UNCAC and engage in UNCAC-based international cooperation.

For additional information, please contact:

Ms. MEI Fen,
official of the International Cooperation Department,
Ministry of Supervision
meifen@mos.gov.cn

Agenda:

Presentations:

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Wednesday, 8 November 2015

9.00-10.30
Conference Room M3

Business integrity and open contracting

Organizer: UNDP Istanbul

In cooperation with the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development and the OECD, the United Nations Development Programme organized a special event titled “Business integrity and open contracting.” The event showcased best practices and cutting-edge solutions in the fields of business integrity and open contracting in Central Asia, South Eastern Europe and Commonwealth of Independent States. The panel covered e-procurement/open contracting, sources and types of business integrity risks, incentives and measures to ensure business integrity, criminalization of corruption, internal corruption-preventive mechanisms within private companies, conflicts of interest and whistle-blowers’ protection. The event aimed to articulate, based on the real-life examples, on the need to enhance legislations and practices to limit business integrity risks in the private sector and in the government-owned companies. Speakers included Mr. Patrick Keuleers, Director of Governance and Peacebuilding at the Bureau for Policy and Programme Support of the United Nations Development Programme; Ms. Lisa Rosen, Chief Compliance Officer of the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development; Ms. Olga Savran, Manager of the Anti-Corruption Network for Eastern Europe and Central Asia at the OECD; Ms. Hera Hussain, Senior Advocacy Manager at Open Contracting Partnership; Ms. Ieva Lapeikienë of Clear Wave; and Mr. Oleksandr Seryogin, Member of the Council of National Agency for Prevention of Corruption of Ukraine.

For additional information, please contact:

Irakli Kotetishvili,
Bureau for Policy and Programme Support,
UNDP Istanbul Regional Hub,
irakli.kotetishvili@undp.org

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9.00-10.30
Conference Room M6

Making SDG16 count in the Pacific

Organizer: UNODC

As Pacific countries strengthen their commitment to SDGs, the importance of SDG 16’s focus on justice, anti-corruption and accountability is seen as a key to genuine implementation. This event aims to demonstrate how Pacific countries, and beyond, can more effectively implement UNCAC and work towards the achievement of SDG 16 through their National Development Policies.
Making Sdg 16 Count In The Pacific will highlight the need to build integrity and preventing corrupt practices in public institutions and the public service, strengthen governance systems in ocean and land resources management to protect environment and livelihoods of small island developing States, and the need to improve anti-corruption frameworks to strengthen and build resilience of SIDS against impacts of climate change.

For additional information, please contact:

Maria Adomeit,
UN Pacific Regional Anti-Corruption (UN-PRAC) project

Agenda:

Presentations:

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9.00-11.00
Conference Room M7

The role of FIUs in combating corruption: how financial Intelligence reveals and assists in corruption investigations

Organizer: Israel

As Financial Intelligence Units (FIUs) hold unique financial intelligence, monitoring and analysis IT tools and professional analysis expertise and are part of an international intelligence network, they are significant players in identifying, initiating and assisting global corruption investigations, as envisioned by several UNCAC provisions.

This Special event will focus on the central role FIUs have in combating global corruption and will discuss the broad experience of the Israeli FIU, based on domestic and international cooperation with other law enforcement authorities, while outlining best practices and lessons learned along its significant experience in the field, emphasizing the need for a proactive approach to efficiently combat corruption.

For additional information, please contact:

Dana Daybog
Israel Money Laundering and Terror Financing Prohibition Authority
danada@impa.justice.gov.il

Flyer:
English

Agenda:

Presentations:

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9.00-10.30
Press Room

Tackling grand corruption – what the UNCAC CoSP can do

Organizer: Transparency International

TTransparency International defines grand corruption as the abuse of high-level power that benefits the few at the expense of the many, and causes serious and widespread harm to individuals and society. It often goes unpunished. The website of the new International Anti-Corruption Coordination Centre expresses well the case against grand corruption: “Grand corruption increases poverty and inequality, undermines good business and threatens the integrity of financial markets. It can include acts of corruption by politically exposed persons that may involve vast quantities of assets and that threaten political stability and sustainable development.”

The COSP side event on grand corruption on 8 November 2017 will showcase good practices and lessons learned in tackling grand corruption and discuss recommendations to the Conference of States Parties for how to improve efforts in this area. Distinguished panellists from government and civil society will discuss proposals for combating grand corruption, as well as the implications of grand corruption for UNCAC implementation and review. This side event will contribute to discussions at the Conference of States parties on agenda items on prevention, criminalisation and enforcement, and asset recovery.

For additional information, please contact:

Gillian Dell
Head of Conventions Unit
Transparency International
gdell@transparency.org

Agenda:

Presentations:

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13.30-15.00
Conference Room M3

Corruption in sport

Organizer: UNODC

Experts from government, sports organizations and the private sector will have a panel discussion on measures to prevent corruption and protect the integrity of sport.

For additional information, please contact:

Ronan O’Laoire
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch
UNODC
ronan.olaoire@unodc.org

Agenda:

Presentations:

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13.30-15.00
Conference Room M6

Monitoring the implementation of SDGs related to corruption, a new tool

Organizer: UNODC

Under Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16, “Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels”, target 16.5 calls on States to “Substantially reduce corruption and bribery in all their forms”. This represents a major milestone in the fight against corruption, as it marks the commitment by national governments not just to criminalize, prevent or investigate this offence, but also shows how corruption remains a key spoiler to the sustainability of efforts under the SDGs.

As part of the global SDG indicator framework adopted by the UN General Assembly in July 2017, two indicators on the prevalence of bribery - as experienced respectively by the population and the business sector - have been selected to measure progress towards achieving target 16.5.

The lack of statistics is something that has been identified as a gap across all peer-reviews carried out through the implementation review mechanism, with very few exceptions. Hence, it is a challenge felt by all States, regardless of level of development. The requirement for all UN Member States to report on their achievements towards the SDGs is a challenge all States face together.

In order to support States in their efforts to produce experience-based data, and drawing on the need to improve the reliability and validity of existing corruption metrics, UNODC teamed up with the Mexico-based UNODC-INEGI Center of Excellence for Statistical Information and UNDP to develop a new corruption measurement initiative, a manual on the measurement of corruption through population- and business-based sample surveys.

This event, including speakers from UNODC, UNDP and the Austrian Anti-Corruption Bureau, included a briefing on the development of the forthcoming manual. It provided an opportunity for States Parties to the Convention, civil society and the private sector to discuss experiences and challenges in the measurement of corruption using statistical tools and the importance of such tools for evidence-based programme development and policymaking. The discussion stressed the specific value of - respectively - experience and perception-based metrics of corruption and wide consensus was expressed that while neither should be used as a 'proxy' for the other, both forms of surveys have an important role to play. Moreover, national ownership and sustainability of corruption measurement exercises were identified as key elements of a global strategy for improving availability and quality of data on corruption patterns and trends.

For additional information, please contact:

Enrico Bisogno,
UNODC,
enrico.bisogno@unodc.org

Agenda/Flyer:
English

Presentations:
Angela Me

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13.30-15.00
Conference Room M7

Development of anti-corruption compliance and collective action: modern challenges and trends

Organizer: IACA

The special event is organized by the International Anti-Corruption Academy (IACA). The objective of the event is to raise awareness on constantly evolving anti-corruption tools, processes and models. Also, key ingredients of the comprehensive collective action model will be discussed, and the benefits of a state of-the-art compliance programme will be showcased.

In the recent past, the anti-corruption compliance framework has evolved significantly. This development has been possible because of very bold reforms in anti-corruption laws in both the public and private sectors, landmark judgments, the evolution of corporate practices through innovative processes and methods, and the use of collaborative models like collective action. In the anti-corruption arena, the term ‘collective action’ has been acquiring increasing attention as an option for companies volunteering to join forces against corruption. Just like a robust compliance system, collective action plays a crucial role in advancing the anti-corruption agenda and significantly contributes to a culture of transparency and accountability. The event will focus on a variety of activities of the International Anti-Corruption Academy (IACA) in this respect, ranging from a focused corporate compliance programme to collaborative processes of stakeholder cooperation towards curbing corruption, boosting the effect of individual actions, and levelling the playing field among competitors. The event will showcase the achievements of these efforts, as well as illustrate existing anti-corruption principles for businesses, challenges and best practices in implementation, collective action initiatives, and modern trends in the rapidly evolving anti-corruption landscape.

For additional information, please contact:

Carmen Schuber
International Anti-Corruption Academy (IACA)
Carmen.schuber@iaca.int

Flyer:
English

Agenda:
English

Presentations:

-

13.30-15.00
Press Room

Interest and asset disclosures by public officials: what works and what does not? Latest insights from anti-corruption monitoring bodies

Organizer: GRECO

The event was moderated by Mr. Constantine Palicarsky, Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Officer, UNODC; guest speaker included Ms. Laura Stefan, Rules of Law and Anticorruption Coordinator, OECD; Mr. Guillaume Valette-Valla, Secretary General, High Authority for Transparency in Public Life, France; Ms. Lioubov Samokhina, Senior Counsel, Group of States against Corruption (GRECO), Council of Europe; Mr. Shervin Majlessi, Senior Financial Sector Specialist/Senior Legal Adviser, World Bank/UNODC Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative (StAR); Ms. Laura Geler, Deputy Director of the Planning Policy Transparency Area, Anticorruption Office, Argentina; Ms. Conchita Carpio Morales, Ombudsperson of the Philippines.

The side event examined whether and how the deliverables of interests and asset disclosures by public officials (IADPOs) correspond to the objectives set for those systems when designed initially and ascertained what has worked best and why. Where IADPOs have proven less effective, it sought to establish potential obstacles to more effective implementation and enforcement and shared innovative ideas, concepts and solutions. The side event gave fresh momentum to the global dialogue on IADPOs by ascertaining the true functionality of IADPOs and their actual role and place in a holistic national anti-corruption strategy and in the promotion of public sector integrity specifically by highlighting the potential and actual impact of IADPOs for more forceful prevention and detection of corruption and public perception thereof.

Positive global trends have been identified in the discussion, such as increasing compliance rates with IADPOs, e-declaration, more frequent application of sanctions and more successful incorporation of IADPOs in the overall design of anti-corruption strategies and policies. Greater transparency has been achieved through better reporting requirements, which are constantly reviewed and tailored to capture changing vulnerabilities. The positive role of IADPOs for the early detection and, especially, prevention, of conflicts of interest has been emphasized. Lessons learnt highlighted that the IADPO system have shown better results and proven more effective where a single agency, independent from government and parliament, has been vested with an oversight role and provided with adequate resources, including permanent, professional staff. Improved inter-agency co-operation, including for the purpose of referral of violations of IADPO rules to law enforcement bodies, has contributed to more efficient detection and prosecution of corruption offences in some countries. Challenges identified included the tendency of a growing number of declarants and the keeping of multiple declarations, which risk diluting information and undermine the capacity of oversight institutions to effectively assess IADPOs, as well as a complex, frequently changing and sometimes contradictory legislative frameworks.

For additional information, please contact:

Ms Lioubov SAMOKHINA,
Secretariat of the Group of States against Corruption (GRECO),
Council of Europe,
lioubov.samokhina@coe.int

Francesco Checchi,
UNODC ROSEAP,
francesco.checchi@unodc.org

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15.30-17.00
Conference Room M3

Strengthening institutional integrity in prisons: launch of the Handbook on anti-corruption measures in prisons

Organizer: UNODC

Corruption in prisons poses a severe security risk to prisoners, prison staff and prison management alike. Consequently, corruption is often identified as one of the main obstacles to the practical application of the United Nations Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners (the Nelson Mandela Rules). Relevant examples include the embezzlement of funds needed for necessary security measures and infrastructure; the misappropriation of goods; hiring practices that do not consider the qualification, merit and integrity of candidates; trafficking of mobile phones, drugs or weapons into prison in exchange for bribes; and situations in which the provision of basic services are made subject to prisoners’ ability to pay bribes.

The Conference of the States Parties as well as the Crime Congress have repeatedly stressed the importance of strengthening integrity throughout the Justice Sector. Whilst topics such as judicial integrity already receive substantial support and have come a long way, other areas of the criminal justice chain are still neglected. Prisons in particular, are often marked by high levels of and a specific vulnerability to corruption.

In combination, the United Nations Convention against Corruption and the Nelson Mandela Rules provide a solid framework for measures addressing and preventing corruption within the prison system. The Handbook is the first of its kind, building on those international standards, and highlighting the specific problem and diverse measures to reduce the risk of corruption in prisons. It is a first step to raise awareness about the need for further action and to further elevate the subject to the global agenda.

For additional information, please contact:

Constanze von Soehnen
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch
UNODC (CRIMJUST Project)
Constanze.vonsoehnen@unodc.org

Flyer:
English

eBook:
English

Agenda:

Presentations:

-

15.30-17.00
Conference Room M7

Liability of legal persons for corruption cases: status of implementation of UNCAC Article 26

Organizer: UNODC CEB, OECD, Germany

The first cycle of the Implementation Review Mechanism of the United Nations Convention against Corruption identified Article 26 on “Liability of legal persons” as a main area of concern and a priority in terms of technical assistance needs in a large number of States Parties. This event will discuss country experiences and best practices in establishing liability of legal persons (administrative, civil, criminal) for corruption offences and will host a debate on relevant investigation strategies and tools as well as designing effective, proportionate and dissuasive sanctions.

For additional information, please contact:

Francesco Checchi,
UNODC Regional Office for Southeast Asia and the Pacific,
francesco.checchi@unodc.org

Cornelia Koertl,
UNODC Regional Office for Southeast Asia and the Pacific,
cornelia.koertl@unodc.org

Agenda:

Presentations:

-

15.30-17.00
Press Room

The Role of academia in enhancing business integrity: the contribution of integrity and ethics education to anti-corruption efforts

Organizer: UNODC CEB

The event discussed UNODC’s Education for Justice (E4J) initiative, a key component of the Global Programme for the Implementation of the Doha Declaration. The event particularly focused on the E4J university modules on integrity and ethics, and their importance for preventing corruption in the private sector. Following a brief presentation by UNODC on the E4J modules and relevant experience under the Anti-Corruption Academic Initiative (ACAD), participants discussed the following questions: Are universities preparing students for the ethical challenges and corruption risks they will face in their future careers? Would the E4J ethics modules be a useful tool for universities to support the delivery of anti-corruption, integrity and ethics education? How can businesses support universities in delivering anti-corruption, integrity and ethics education? The event was moderated by Ms. Julia Pilgrim, Team Leader of UNODC’s E4J initiative, and the speakers were Ms. Sigall Horovitz of UNODC, Prof. Daniel Malan, Head of the Centre for Corporate Governance in Africa at the University of Stellenbosch Business School, Mr. Gonzalo Guzman, Director of Anti-Corruption Governance and External Engagement at GlaxoSmithKline, and Mr. Noor Naqschbandi, Director of the Alliance for Integrity.

For additional information, please contact:

Sigall Horovitz,
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch,
UNODC,
sigall.horovitz@unodc.org

Flyer:
English

Agenda:

Presentations:
Education for Justice, UNODC

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Thursday, 9 November 2017

9.00-10.30
Conference Room M3

Revisiting the Jakarta principles: strengthening anti-corruption agencies’ independence and effectiveness

Organizer: Corruption Eradication Commission of Indonesia

In Nov. 2012, chiefs of anti-corruption agencies (ACAs) from around the world gathered in Jakarta, Indonesia, invited by the KPK, UNDP and UNODC, and adopted a set of principles for ACAs, aka the Jakarta Principles, to promote and strengthen their independence and effectiveness. Five years onwards, what progress has been achieved and what remains to be done?

For additional information, please contact:

Putri Rahayu Wijayanti
Corruption Eradication Commission of Republic of Indonesia
putri.rahayu@kpk.go.id

Flyer:
English
French

Agenda:

Presentations:

-

9.00-10.30
Conference Room M6

Detection of corruption

Organizer: OECD

A set of distinguished panellists representing a number of disciplines from across the anti-bribery field discussed a number of topics related to the detection of corruption. The panellists – Mr David Fielder (Chief of Investigations and Forensic Audits at the World Bank), Mr Casey Kelso (Director of Advocacy at Transparency International), Mr Stiliano Ordolli (Head of the Money Laundering Reporting Office in Switzerland) and Lorenzo Salazar (from the Court of Appeal in Naples) – were moderated by Ms France Chin, Senior Legal Analyst from the OECD Anti-Corruption Division.

There was a brief presentation which concerned the 20th anniversary of the anti-bribery convention and a transnational study conducted by the OECD to be published in December concerning patterns in detection of corruption.

The presentation also introduced the main topics for debate: detection through whistleblowers, the media and investigative journalism, FIUs, criminal and other legal proceedings and international cooperation. In particular, the panellists addressed whether there have been changes over time in frequency of detection of bribery and in sources of information which lead to detection of bribery; what can be done to encourage whistleblowers; what are the risks faced by journalists detecting bribery and what can nations do to help?

Conclusions arrived at were that, above all else, trust between actors in the field remains essential, but sometimes is in short measure. This applies particularly across national borders. Impacted are FIUs, other government agencies and the private sector. Information flowing from journalists and NGOs remains vital to effective detection. Training is still important, with the peer review system and evaluation process being useful tools in this context.

For additional information, please contact:

France Chain,
Senior Legal Analyst / Manager China Outreach and G20,
OECD Anticorruption Division,
france.chain@oecd.org

Lise Nee,
Legal Analyst,
OECD Anti-Corruption Division,
lise.nee@oecd.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
France Chain

-

9.00-13.30
Conference Room M7

7th Forum of Parliamentarians

Organizer: GOPAC

The Forum of Parliamentarians at CoSP has been a key component of engaging parliamentarians in UNCAC. This year, the Global Organisation of Parliamentarians Against Corruption (GOPAC) will focus the 7th Forum on Oversight Matters and MPs Improving Development Effectiveness. Parliamentary oversight has been a key component of good practice UNCAC implementation. With the advent of measureable SDGs, parliamentarians have to ensure that oversight of the SDGs learns from UNCAC and follows good governance practices. The Forum aims to enhance the capacity of parliamentarians to localise the UNCAC by adapting international standards to national needs and to play an important oversight role in the monitoring and review of the national effort to implement the UNCAC. The Forum will also encourage parliamentarians and States Parties to the UNCAC to incorporate good practices from SDG16 to bolster accountability and transparency.

For additional information, please contact:

John Hyde,
GOPAC Secretary
gopacau@gmail.com

Agenda:

Presentations:

-

9.00-10.30
Press Room

Enhancing the cooperation between the secretariats of international anti-corruption peer review mechanisms

Organizer: UNODC-CEB

In the margins of the seventh session of the Conference of the States parties to the United Nations Convention against Corruption, UNODC organized a special event entitled “Enhancing the cooperation between the secretariats of international anti-corruption peer review mechanisms”. The event was conceived as a follow-up to a workshop held previously at the OECD headquarters in Paris in September 2016. The side-event featured a panel with representatives of GRECO, the OECD and UNODC, as well as some countries that are active in two or more review mechanisms (Austria, Belgium, France, Greece, Israel, Mexico, the Netherlands and Russia). Panellists agreed on the need for cooperation and coordination of the work of the various review mechanisms in order to harvest possible synergies. However, they also acknowledged the limits to such cooperation, stemming from the different memberships, mandates, and procedures of the mechanisms, and they highlighted the different strengths and specificities of each of them.

For additional information, please contact:

Oliver Landwehr,
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch,
UNODC,
oliver.landwehr@unodc.org

Agenda:

Presentations:
Hortense Jongen

-

13.30–15.00
Conference Room M3

Follow up on the Addis Ababa Action Agenda – International Expert Meeting on the Management and Disposal of Recovered and Returned Stolen Assets, including in Support of Sustainable Development

Organizer: Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation

The objective of the event was to raise awareness on the link between recovered assets and their use for sustainable development. The organizers recalled that in both the Agenda 2030 (Goal 16.4) and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda (para. 25) asset return is linked to sustainable development with the goal to ensure that the population of countries to which assets are being returned benefit from them. Participants in the side event discussed the links and mechanics between asset recovery, financing for development and the Sustainable Development Goals, and explored possible avenues and processes of how to bring these agendas together. The event also presented and showcased principles and best practices of how asset return can happen for the benefit for sustainable development.

The event was co-chaired by Ethiopia (Girma Werku) and UNODC (John Brandolino). Experts from Guatemala (H.E. Thelma Aldana), Kenya (Halakhe Waqo), Switzerland (Ambassador Stefan Flückiger) and the United Kingdom (Phil Mason) shared their experience.

For additional information, please contact:

Walter Reithebuch
Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation – Switzerland
walter.reithebuch@eda.admin.ch

Agenda/Flyer:
English

Presentations:

-

13.30–15.00
Conference Room M6

Promoting integrity in State-Owned Enterprises (SOEs): trends and challenges

Organizer: Alliance for Integrity

In this special event organized by the Alliance for Integrity, experts and practitioners from different stakeholder groups discussed trends and challenges of promoting integrity in state-owned enterprises (SOEs). SOEs constitute a large share of global business, delivering important goods and services such as electricity, infrastructure, health care, and natural resources. SOEs face particularly high integrity risks based on their proximity to the government, their prevalence in corruption-prone sectors, and weak corporate governance practices. The panellists agreed that promoting integrity among SOEs is a timely task with a view to their important role in increasing the efficiency of public spending, promoting sustainable economic development and strengthening trust in public institutions. A number of potential solutions on the policy and implementation level were discussed. Transparency International is currently working on SOE Principles for Countering Corruption that will serve as a framework for SOEs to develop comprehensive integrity programmes. Other relevant measures include the introduction of independent directors, limiting political influence in the board, leveraging the potential of digitalization, increasing citizens’ engagement and strengthening disclosure practices, i.e. in parallel to requirements of public listings on stock exchanges. Furthermore, panellists emphasized that SOEs can learn from practical solutions developed by the private sector such as the introduction of compliance officers, good practices on how to develop internal guidelines and procedures, the adaptation of training programmes and the engagement in collective action initiatives.

For additional information, please contact:

Carolina Echevarria,
Alliance for Integrity,
Carolina.echevarria@giz.de;

Florian Lair,
GIZ,
florian.lair@giz.de

Agenda:

Agenda/Flyer:
English

Presentations:

-

14.00-15.30
Conference Room M7

Economic crimes and corruption in cyberspace

Organizer: IACA

Corruption, financial fraud, and other economic crimes nowadays are cyber-enabled. Criminals use the cyberspace to move money instantly around the globe. During the side event organized by IACA and INTERPOL, practitioners and academics will discuss challenges of building a stringent cybersecurity framework to counter corruption and other economic crimes in the cyberspace

For additional information, please contact:

Simona Marin
Senior Officer for External Relations & Protocol
International Anti-Corruption Academy (IACA)
E: simona.marin@iaca.int

Agenda:

Presentations:

-

15.30-17.00
Conference Room M3

Fighting corruption in cities: identifying risks and reacting on time, the role of local governments

Organizer: UNODC, UN-Habitat/Local Governments and Decentralization Unit

The special event was organized by UN Habitat, and had the objective of addressing anti-corruption measures in municipalities, particularly the role of local governments. The participants represented different municipality associations from Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Europe and Latin America, and the event was moderated by Ms. Diana Lopez, Chief of the Decentralization and Local Governments Unit of UN Habitat. Ms. Candice Welsch, Chief of the Implementation Support Section of UNODC’s Corruption and Economic Crime Branch, reiterated UNODC’s commitment to promoting participation of society and strengthening local governments in the fight against corruption.

Mr. Richard Rwabuhinga, Chairperson of the Kabarole District of Uganda, highlighted the need for increased citizen participation in local governmental oversight, and gave the example of how his municipality established a mechanism through which feedback is gathered from the population. Mr. Rwabuhinga also noted the importance of localizing anti-corruption policies and involving local governments in the formulation thereof.

Ms. Sally Ante Lee, mayor of Sorsogon City in the Philippines, informed the participants of the various mechanisms available in her municipality which ensure transparency and accountability. Aside from national legislation in the Philippines, the municipality enshrined transparency and citizen participation in its mission and vision, created a specific charter to govern citizen participation and established concrete mechanisms to involve civil society organizations, the private sector and people in local governmental processes.

The mayor of Oaxaca, Mexico, Mr. José Antonio Hernández, outlined the Mexican experience on local government’s actions on the prevention of corruption, as well as those of his municipality. Mexico has national systems for local government coordination as well as for ensuring citizen participation and oversight. National and local laws established standards for public officials and auditing. In Oaxaca, thematic citizen councils oversee the use of public resources by the local government, and their decisions are binding upon the government.

The last speaker, mayor of Mostoles, Spain, Mr. David Lucas Parrón, outlined the activities undertaken in Spanish and European municipalities. Mr. Parrón emphasized the need for a partnership between citizens and local governments to ensure transparency in that level. Access to information must be ensured for this participation to be effective, and results may take time to be evident. The Spanish Federation of Municipalities and Provinces established guidelines and mechanisms to promote citizen participation.

Speakers also engaged participants in questions and answers, where good practices on local governance and anti-corruption were shared. The event highlighted the importance of citizen participation to ensure accountability for local governments.

For additional information, please contact:

Diana López Caramazana,
UN-Habitat / Local Governments and Decentralization Unit,
diana.lopez@unhabitat.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Sally Ante Lee
Candice Welsch

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15.30-17.00
Conference Room M6

Prevention and integrity in public administration

Organizer: GIZ

The event was moderated by: Nicole Botha, Programme Manager: Sector Programme: Anti-Corruption and Integrity, GIZ. Guest speaker included Viola Pettau, Anti-Corruption Focal Person, German Ministry of Interior, Anga Timilsina, Programme Manager of UNDP’s Anti-Corruption for Peaceful and Inclusive Societies (ACPIS) Project Susanna Silva, Lawyer, Former Coordinator of the High Level Commission for Anti-Corruption Peru, Diego Jiménez, Viceminister of Institutional Transparency and Fight against Corruption, Bolivia

The event discussed the G20 High Level Principles (HLP) relating to corruption. In particular HLP “Organizing against Corruption” deals with corruption prevention measures regarding the organizational structure and management of public service. The G20 committed themselves to facilitate international peer exchange and provide technical assistance to State Parties of the UNCAC. This event brought together experts and practitioners, as well as providers of technical assistance, to share best practices and their views on the implementation of the G20 HLP. The event focused on UNCAC Article 5, 6 and 7, which are also the basis of the HLP of the G20.

The panelists presented various tools and initiatives for the implementation of the high level principle “Organizing against Corruption”, enhancing transparency and accountability in the public sector and supporting the utilization of open data for transparency and accountability, integrating the open data by default principle was also highlighted as a possibility. The idea of utilizing some of the tools and programmes for compliance developed by the private sector, such as risk assessments, to the public sector was also discussed. UNDP presented a recent study on public sector excellence, describing a framework for capacity development based on the differentiation between work at the individual level, organizational level and macro level and on the necessity of a streamlined approach to prevention of corruption work in different contexts. Recent institutional reforms for transparency and accountability in Bolivia were presented by Vice Minister Jimenez, particularly focusing on the necessity of strategies that are effective in relation to different economic and governance systems.

For additional information, please contact:

Richard Huelsmann,
GIZ,
Richard.Huelsmann@giz.de

Aida Arutyunova
Anti-Corruption Specialist
Bureau for Policy and Programme Support, UNDP
aida.arutyunova@undp.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Anga Timilsina
Susanna Silva

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16.00-17.30
Conference Room M7

IFF in developing countries: stolen assets and the role of the media and civil society

Organizer: GIZ

The Special Event entitled “IFFs in developing countries: Stolen Assets and the Role of the Media and Civil Society (CSOs)” was organized by the German development agency GIZ. The panelists addressed three main questions, including (1) the impact of major leaks like the Panama Papers and Paradise Papers on developing countries and their anticorruption commitments; (2) How the voices of investigative journalists from developing countries can be strengthened; and (3) How can civil society contribute to asset recovery efforts?

The panelists consisted of:

David Ugolor, a leading Nigerian anti-corruption and environmental justice activist and Executive Director of the Africa Network for Environment and Economic Justice (ANEEJ) outlined the importance of Panama/Paradise Papers Leak, and Nigerian civil society in creating political will to demand the repatriation of stolen assets.

Hisham Allam, an award-winning investigative journalist who has contributed to the cross-border investigation “Swiss Leaks”, the Panama Papers leaks, and the recent Paradise Papers leak described the chances and challenges of cooperation between the investigative journalists.

Henriette Kötter, a Senior Policy Officer at BMZ, the German Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development in the Division for Sectoral and thematic policies gave an overview of BMZ’s commitment to strengthening civil society in developing countries in order to contribute to the fight against illicit financial flows.

Agatino Camarda, a co-founder of the Civil Forum for Asset Recovery – CiFAR based in Berlin, Germany, spoke about its project implementation, fundraising and networking and presented his organization’s work with young investigative journalists in financial investigation and asset recovery in the Mediterranean.

For additional information, please contact:

Lindy Muzila,
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch,
UNODC,
lindy.muzila@unodc.org

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15.30-17.30
Press Room

Corruption risk management: organizational and sectoral aspects

Organizer: UNODC CEB

Corruption risk management is a topic of growing interest for States parties. If properly used, it provides valuable information to decision-makers on the specific risks in the organizations and allows for timely response to these risks. Multiple approaches to CRA have been tested in the past with mixed results. The event will bring together practitioners from countries where UNODC and UNDP supported corruption risk assessments and will provide insights into the methodologies used and results achieved. The links and synergies between the corruption risk assessment methodologies employed will be examined.

For additional information, please contact:

Tim Steele,
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch,
UNODC,
tim.steele@unodc.org

Agenda:

Presentations:

-

Friday, 10 November 2017

9.00-10.30
Conference Room M3

Corruption & international laws and judgements

Organizer: Centre for International Human Rights, North-western Pritzker School of Law

The misuse of police, courts and international institutions, whether to sanction civil society, political opponents or the media, are tools of corruption. When these institutions are used to silence dissent, to retain and expand power and to enrich corrupt officials, ongoing cycles of corruption form, in which attempts to shine light on corruption are addressed by the same corrupt institutions at issue. International laws, standards and tribunals are designed as bulwarks against this misuse of critical institutions. The effectiveness of these protections is limited, however, to the extent corrupt domestic officials disregard them. This event will provide examples of the problem and a framework for addressing its solutions, discussing key components of the UNCAC: prevention, enforcement, and mutual legal assistance.

For additional information, please contact:

Juliet S. Sorensen,
Center for International Human Rights,
Northwestern Pritzker School of Law,
j-sorensen@law.northwestern.edu

Agenda:

Presentations:

-

9.00-10.30
Conference Room M6
CANCELLED

Public procurement corruption: information, intelligence and evidence

Organizer: UNODC CEB

The event will focus on the challenges associated with using the information obtained in the course of corruption risk assessment or intelligence collection exercise for prosecution of public procurement fraud and corruption. Representatives of international organizations and Financial Intelligence Units will share their views on the approaches to coherent use of information for effective detection, investigation and prosecution of procurement fraud and corruption.

For additional information, please contact:

Tim Steele,
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch,
UNODC, tim.steele@unodc.org

Agenda:

Presentations:

-

9.00-10.30
Conference Room M7

NACIWA General Assembly Meeting

Organizer: Anti-Corruption Commission of Liberia

The NACIWA General Assembly meeting will bring together heads of anti-corruption authorities from West Africa. The meeting will review progress achieved by NACIWA and its members in the fight against corruption since the last GA meeting in July 2016, review draft internal rules and procedures, adopt a NACIWA work plan for 2018, and elect a new Board for the coming two years.

For additional information, please contact:

James Verdier Jr.
Chairman, Anti-Corruption Commission of Liberia, jnverdierjr@lacc.gov.lr
President ai, Network of National Anti-Corruption Institutions in West Africa (NACIWA)

Agenda:

Presentations:

 
-

13.30-15.00
Conference Room M6

The global state of democracy: money, influence, corruption and capture. Can democracy be protected?

Organizer: International IDEA

The special event drew from the International IDEA new publication on the Global State of Democracy and explored how democracy could be protected from the pernicious influence of money, both legal and illegal. Experts from IDEA shared the knowledge about the latest comparative research particularly on the negative effects of money in politics. Event also brought together experts from the OECD, UNODC and INTERPOL who further addressed how UNCAC could facilitate the development of global and regional political funding standards, what additional areas of international policy innovation could be explored to tackle the influence of illicit interests over politics and what are the main challenges and opportunities for law enforcement agencies in dealing corruption cases related to political finance. The event agreed that following the UNCAC adoption the increased number of countries adopted the regulations on political party funding, but many issues are yet to be fully addressed to avoid negative effects of money in politics. Lobbying was highlighted as one of the most important as driven by financial powers and interest. Other main aspects highlighted were the need to foster the culture of integrity, transparency and effective implementation of all existing measures and laws.

For additional information, please contact:

Catalina Uribe Burcher,
International IDEA,
C.UribeBurcher@idea.int

Flyer:
English

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Catalina Uribe Burcher
Yukihiko Hamada

 
-

13.30-15.00
Conference Room M7

NACIWA General Assembly Meeting (continued)

Organizer: Anti-Corruption Commission of Liberia

The NACIWA General Assembly meeting will bring together heads of anti-corruption authorities from West Africa. The meeting will review progress achieved by NACIWA and its members in the fight against corruption since the last GA meeting in July 2016, review draft internal rules and procedures, adopt a NACIWA work plan for 2018, and elect a new Board for the coming two years.

For additional information, please contact:

James Verdier Jr.
Chairman, Anti-Corruption Commission of Liberia, jnverdierjr@lacc.gov.lr
President ai, Network of National Anti-Corruption Institutions in West Africa (NACIWA)

Agenda:

Presentations:

 
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