Engaging young people in sports programmes can help reduce violent extremism
December 6, 2019

Engaging young people in sports programmes can help reduce violent extremism

Physical activities are an integral part of education in most countries today, and the popularity of different sports is universal, whether played in teams or individually. Increasingly, the practice of sports is also seen as one of the tools which can bring a crucial benefit to society: the prevention of violent extremism.

The Line Up, Live Up initiative, developed by the Youth Crime Prevention through Sports component of UNODC's Global Programme for the Implementation of the Doha Declaration, stems from the premise that sports can be a vehicle to increase young people's resilience to crime, violence and drug use. Through meaningful engagement with youth in marginalized areas or from disadvantaged backgrounds, Line Up, Live Up packs life skills training and physical activities during ten sessions with especially trained coaches.

UNODC’s innovative education and university partnerships are empowering young scholars
December 3, 2019

UNODC's innovative education and university partnerships are empowering young scholars

Academic conferences present scholars with opportunities not just to exchange important ideas, but also to question and challenge them; through this dynamic process, theories are worked and reworked, eventually forming a solid framework that applies in practice, beyond theory. For the Education for Justice (E4J) initiative, a component of the Global Programme for the Implementation of the Doha Declaration, such interactive conferences are an essential step in UNODC's drive to fulfil the internationally-agreed Sustainable Development Goals, especially SDG16 for peace, justice and strong institutions which falls under UNODC's remit.

Guidelines on creating a brand of prison products launched by UNODC this week
November 27, 2019

Guidelines on creating a brand of prison products launched by UNODC this week

Penitentiary systems around the world are increasingly adopting prisoner rehabilitation initiatives as they attempt to reduce crime in their communities. Not only are rehabilitated prisoners less likely to reoffend, to fall back into criminal activities or to endanger society, but they also are more likely to become financially self-sufficient if they have been trained in a discipline or trade which they can continue to practice once liberated.

Various rehabilitation educational and vocational programmes are being applied in different prison systems, including some of those supported by UNODC. In addition to these types of rehabilitative exercises, there are other common schemes in which prisoners are employed during their sentence, producing goods that are usable within the prison and also marketable outside.

Jericho’s first batch of electrical installations certified prisoners graduate
November 21, 2019

Jericho's first batch of electrical installations certified prisoners graduate

The pace of prisoner rehabilitation programmes is gaining traction around the world, with more penitentiary systems looking for ways to better prepare prisoners for reinsertion into society after completing their sentence. Such programmes not only contribute to helping prisoners become financially independent upon release, but have also been proven to reduce the possibility of recidivism.

This month, nine male prisoners proudly received their diplomas for Electrical Installations, after successfully completing the first advanced Technical, Vocational and Educational Training (TVET) at the Jericho Correctional and Rehabilitation Centre in the State of Palestine. 

30 years on, the Convention on the Rights of the Child remains relevant and needed
November 20, 2019

30 years on, the Convention on the Rights of the Child remains relevant and needed

When the General Assembly adopted the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child thirty years ago today, it quickly became the most ratified international human rights treaty in history, now signed by 196 countries. This comprehensive document, addressing both the rights of children and the responsibilities of Governments to enable and protect these rights, explicitly details over 54 articles of a wide variety of rights all children automatically enjoy, regardless of where or when they are born; these include every basic human right, whose universal application should ensure a drastic improvement in our collective quality of life. When children are knowledgeable about their rights, they also have a deeper understanding of their role in society, and of the role they each play in contributing to making the world a better and safer place.