Conceptualizing corruption to design effective policies: how education is key to tackling crime
June 19, 2017

Conceptualizing corruption to design effective policies: how education is key to tackling crime

UNODC, the Interdisciplinary Corruption Research Network (ICRN) and Sciences-Po Paris held a two-day academic event bringing together over 80 researchers and academics from some 50 countries to look at how to develop effective policies to tackle corruption. Among others, the event aimed to better understand the role of corruption in post-conflict societies, the historical roots of corruption as well as the role of big data to help combat the problem.

UN entities discuss human rights education in Geneva
June 2, 2017

UN entities discuss human rights education in Geneva

The Education for Justice (E4J) initiative took part in a discussion in Geneva on the role of human rights education (HRE) in advancing the Education 2030 Agenda. The Seminar, entitled "  How Can Human Rights Education and Training be Promoted through the Education 2030 Agenda, especially Target 4.7?" brought together key United Nations entities for a round-table on their respective education programmes. Aside from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, the other UN bodies included the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

The Seminar focused on synergies between the various education programmes and how the Education 2030 Agenda addresses human rights education. In his opening remarks, Ambassador Maurizio Serra, Permanent Representative of Italy, highlighted the work of the States Platform on Human Rights Education and Training, which is co-chaired with Brazil, in bringing cross-regional perspectives into human rights education.

‘Dogui and Dengoso’ – the cartoon duo showcasing ethics in primary schools
May 9, 2017

'Dogui and Dengoso' - the cartoon duo showcasing ethics in primary schools

As part of its Education for Justice (E4J) initiative, UNODC is seeking to promote values among primary-level school children and in this context held a workshop in May at the Carmen Sole Bosch school on the outskirts of Panama City. Over 230 children from pre-kindergarten to second grade took part in the one-day workshop during which integrity, honesty and ethics was taught at this early - and highly formative - age.

Run by UNODC Panama, and supported by E4J, the workshop revolved around the character duo Dogui (a dog) and Dengoso (a mosquito), two characters that were created by UNODC's Panama Office. The former represents the positive: Dogui goes to school, cares about others and advocates the values which are key to a safer and more just world; Dengoso, on the other hand, is an antagonist and a negative influence: constantly trying to persuade Dogui to follow the less honest path by lying and cheating. 

Innovation Lab gives Pacific youth space to develop creative solutions to corruption
May 2, 2017

Innovation Lab gives Pacific youth space to develop creative solutions to corruption

With the aim of developing innovative solutions to address corruption, youth representatives and students from some 13 Pacific Island countries and territories gathered this past week for the  Pacific Youth Anti-Corruption Innovation Lab held in Nadi, Fiji. Held over three days, the event also considered how education can best be used as a tool to foster the culture of integrity and lawfulness and ultimately counter corruption.

"The idea of the Anti-Corruption Innovation Lab is to provide a platform for young leaders from the region to get together and brainstorm creative approaches to increase youth involvement in the area of anti-corruption, thereby contributing to the achievement of Sustainable Development Goal 16 targets in the Pacific", noted UNODC's Regional Anti-Corruption Adviser, Maria Adomeit.

Education for Justice: Countering cybercrime, creating prosperity
April 12, 2017

Education for Justice: Countering cybercrime, creating prosperity

UNODC began its Global Programme on Cybercrime in 2013, following Resolution 22/8 of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice. Focussing upon building the capabilities of those in the global South, the work is varied: in some instances, this means developing a legislative framework; in others, the focus is on building the capabilities of law enforcement officers to investigate cyber-dependent offences. 

Law enforcement cannot, however, end cybercrime through arrests and prosecutions. Prevention is truly the key. The Education for Justice (E4J) initiative provides a unique opportunity to address a significant threat in a different way: by educating children and young adults to become conscious of cyber-risk and ultimately to make better decisions.