Global Judicial Integrity Network

Corruption in the justice system - whether actual or perceived - poses a real threat to confidence in the rule of law. 

The Global Judicial Integrity Network aims to assist judiciaries across the globe in strengthening judicial integrity and preventing corruption in the justice sector, in line with article 11 of the United Nations Convention against Corruption

UNODC has been providing assistance to Member States in strengthening judicial integrity, accountability and professionalism since 2000, by supporting the development of the Bangalore Principles of Judicial Conduct and producing various tools to help judiciaries to that effect.

On the occasion of the first International Day of Women Judges
March 7, 2022

Key Messages by the Global Judicial Integrity Network Advisory Board on the occasion of the first International Day of Women Judges

 On the occasion of the first ever International Day of Women Judges on 10 March 2022, the members of the Advisory Board of the Global Judicial Integrity Network would like to share with the Network's audience their views on the importance of this International Day and the role of women judges in strengthening the judiciary and judicial integrity. The Advisory Board members invite all participants of the Network to join them in celebrating this International Day and reflecting on the ways to promote the full and equal participation of women at all levels of the judiciary. 

August 25, 2021

The Global Judicial Integrity Network: Implementing Artificial Intelligence Projects in Judiciaries

Chief Justice Salika and Ms. Alison Holt of the Judiciary of Papua New Guinea describe their ongoing efforts to digitization judicial processes, as well as explore the potential uses of AI to improve efficiency.

Judicial Wellbeing and Its Implication for Access to Justice
The Global Judicial Integrity Network: Improving Access to Justice through Judicial Outreach
Taking the Lead in Supporting Judiciaries
Building a comprehensive risk management in the judiciary
June 13, 2022

Building a comprehensive risk management in the judiciary 

In the last decade, the associations of judges and the creators of the judicial policies have been focusing on the questions of promoting independence or ethical issues, but generally little attention has been paid to the issues of corruption in the judiciary. As a result, there is often an absence of streamlined sectoral anti-corruption and risk management policies in the judiciary, a lack of integrity and corruption measurement practices, and insufficient communication with relevant stakeholders, media and the public. 

Corruption risks in the judiciary should be identified in areas in which judges exercise discretion. Judges should have unfettered freedom to decide cases impartially, without pressure and in accordance with the law and the facts. Most frequently, external pressure is canalized through internal judicial channels, such as judicial councils, superior courts, presidents or the judges themselves. External pressure can also take a form of a social pressure by peers or friendly relations among judges, with judges giving and receiving favours due to belonging to the same social group - judicial community. External pressure can also come through negative comments from the executive branch proposing measures such as general re-election and vetting of all judges, which represents a direct pressure on judges.