Preparations exempted from the control measures of the Narcotics Conventions

Sections

CONCLUSIONS

Details

Pages: 1 to 8
Creation Date: 1951/01/01

GENERAL

Preparations exempted from the control measures of the Narcotics Conventions

Under the provisions of article 8 of the1925 Convention, preparations which would otherwise fall under the Convention might be exempted by the Health Committee of the League of Nations. The article reads as follows:

"In the event of the Health Committee of the League of Nations, after having submitted the question for advice and report to the Permanent Committee of the Office-in-ternational d'Hygiene publique in Paris, finding that any preparation containing any of the narcotic drugs referred to in the present Chapter cannot give rise to the drug habit on account of the medicaments with which the said drugs are compounded and which in practice preclude the recovery of the said drugs, the Health Committee shall communicate this finding to the Council of the League of Nations. The Council will communicate the finding to the Contracting Parties, and thereupon the provisions of the present Convention will not be applicable to the preparation concerned."

Under article 10, narcotic drugs could be added to the scope of the Convention, but the finding of the Health Committee under article 10 was merely a recommendation, and had to be accepted by parties to the Convention to have any effect

Considerable work was done by the Health Committee under article 10, but it was practically all superseded, as regards effectiveness, by the 1931 Convention, which specifically named the drugs that had been found "liable to similar abuse and productive of similar ill-effects" as the substances listed in article 4 of the 1925 Convention.

However, article 8 of the 1925 Convention was in no way superseded by the 1931 Convention; the exemptions already made were not recommendations but decisions, and were continued by article 13, 1( a), of the 1931 Convention, which reads as follows:

"The High Contracting Parties shall apply to all the drugs in Group I the provisions of the Geneva Convention which are thereby applied to substances specified in its fourth article (or provisions in conformity therewith). The High Contracting Parties shall also apply these provisions to preparations made from morphine and cocaine and covered by article 4 of the Geneva Convention and to all other preparations made from the other drugs in Group I except such preparations as may be exempted from the provisions of the Geneva Convention under its eighth article."

The work of deciding which preparations should be exempted was nearly all done in 1928 to 1930. Nevertheless the exemptions granted included some for preparations of drugs not named in the 1925 Convention, but recommended for inclusion under its article 10. When these drugs were taken under control by the 1931 Convention, the exemptions presumably continued.

The present text of the 1925 Convention has its articles 8 and 10 changed by the Protocol signed at Lake Success, 11 December 1946. However, the changes merely give to the World Health Organization the functions formerly assigned to the Health Committee of the League of Nations, and appear to relate only to future procedure, without changing past decisions, although presumably these could be reviewed and reconsidered by the World Health Organization. The World Health Organization has considered certain requests for exemptions under article 8 of the revised 1925 Convention.

Apparently the original decisions on exemptions were not reconsidered in the light of the 1931 Conventions, and some could no longer appear to be consonant with the present international legislation situation.

Thus, five heroin preparations were exempted. The 1931 Convention in its article 10 imposes special restrictions on heroin (diacetylmorphine) and its preparations. Paragraph 1 of article 10 reads as follows:

"The High Contracting Parties shall prohibit the export from their territories of diacetylmorphine, its salts, and preparations containing diacetylmorphine, or its salts."

Paragraph 2 of article 10 also includes the preparations of diacetylmorphine. In the light of these provisions, it may be questioned whether any exemptions of heroin preparations are possible for parties to the 1931 Convention, in spite of its article 13.

It would be of interest to consider the decision exempting the "Anti-opium tablets" which contain nearly one per cent of eucodal. The following words were added:

"This preparation should not be exempted from the operation of the Geneva Convention except on condition that it is not offered to the public under the name of 'Anti-opium'. The Health Committee considers that no preparation exempted from the operation of the Convention should be described as 'Anti-opium'." (C. L. 302.1930.III. Annex I, November 1930. This condition immediately followed the listing of the preparation and was in bold-face type.)

After the legality of a conditional exemption was questioned, this was reduced to "hope" or "wish". The Health Committee "expresses the hope that this preparation will not be presented to the public under the name of 'Anti-opium pills'; such an appellation, suggesting as it does a property which this preparation does not in fact possess, is calculated to increase its consumption." (C.980.M.545.1931.III.)

In the "Recapitulatory List of Preparations exempted from the Provisions of the 1925 International Opium Convention by Application of article 8 of that Convention" (C.114.M.54.1932.III, January 1932), this preparation still appeared as "Anti-opium tablets", with the following as a footnote:

"In exempting this preparation from the operation of the Geneva Convention, the Health Committee expressed the wish that it should not be offered to the public under the name of 'Anti-opium'."

It is still exempt today, under the same name. It should be remembered that when this preparation was originally exempted, eucodal was not specifically named in the Convention, but the Health Committee was trying to bring it under the 1925 Convention by means of article 10.

Several preparations were notified as withdrawn by the proposing government, after having been approved for exemption by the Health Committee. The withdrawal after approval of the exemption might be subject to question. When a preparation was decided to be properly exempt, the decision was not for one government, but for all parties to the Convention. The proposal of a government for exemption of a preparation merely called the attention of the Health Committee to that preparation; article 8 does not require that there be any proposal by a government at all. It may be considered that the acquiescence of the Health Committee in this procedure amounted to a reconsideration and reversal of its decision, but this would certainly indicate the necessity of improving the procedure. Unguentum Gallae cum Opio was proposed and then-after approval of the exemption-"withdrawn" by the Government of the Sudan, but remained on the list because it had also been proposed by the Governments of Great Britain and the Union of South Africa.

Half a dozen preparations were notified as exempted, and then not included in the "Recapitulatory List". At least one of these seems to have been a simple oversight: the formula for Pulvis ipecacuanhae compositus (Dover's powder) was given only with potassium sulphate; the alternatives, using lactose or sugar, were not given. The formula with lactose had, however, been proposed for exemption by Romania, and the exemption approved and notified, with the formula specifically set out. This formula was also inferentially proposed by Germany, which cited the Deutsches Arzneibuch 6; this was also approved and notified. The British Pharmacopoeia now uses lactose instead of potassium sulphate. The alternative with sugar was inferentially proposed by Austria, which cited the Austrian Pharmacopoeia VIII, and this was also approved and notified. However, the reason for dropping these six preparations is not quite clear, although one of them, Pasta Arsenicalis, may be considered as included under Caustic Nerve Pastes. One, Indian Cigarettes of Grimault, a cannabis or Indian hemp preparation, was crossed out during the preparation of the "Recapitulatory List", but the Secretariat have not ascertained the reason.

PREPARATIONS NOTIFIED AS WITHDRAWN BY THE PROPOSING GOVERNMENT, SUBSEQUENT TO APPROVAL OF THE EXEMPTION BY THE HEALTH COMMITTEE (C.H.839, February 1930).

 

Preparation

Formula

Government and date of withdrawal

1.
Pilulae cimifugae et morphinae
1/10 gr. Morphine Sulph. and 2/3 gr. Quinine Sulph.
Sudan 13 July 1929
2.
Solution of Yatsen
Cocaine 2.5% and Yatsen Casein
Austria 10 April 1929
3.
Winter's injections
Cocaine H. 0.0095 Adrenalin in Phenol solution, Chlor. of Soda
Austria 11 November 1929

These preparations were approved for exemption at the Thirteenth session of the Health Committee, October 1928. (C. 555. M175. 1928. III.)

PREPARATIONS NOTIFIED AS EXEMPTED BUT NOT INCLUDED IN THE "RECAPITULATORY LIST"

Preparation

Formula

Government

Notification

1. Pasta Arsenicalis
B.P.C.
Great Britain
C. H. 839
 
 
Union of South Africa
 
2. Anodyne Balm
Dried officinal opium - 60 gr
Argentina
C. H. 839
 
Soap - 120 gr.
 
 
 
Camphor - 90 gr.
 
 
 
Saffron - 30 gr.
 
 
 
Alcohol 800 - 3,000 gr.
 
 
3. Tablets of powdered Ipecacuanha with Opium
Austrian Pharmacopoeia VIII
Austria
C. H. 839
4a. Dover's Powder
Radicis Ipecacuanhae VI,
Austria
C. H. 839
 
Pulveris Opii preparati V, 22 partum - 1
 
 
 
Sacchari V, Partes - 8
 
 
 
(Austrian Pharmacopoeia VIII - 1906)
 
 
4b. Pulvis Doveri (Pulvis Opii et Ipecacuanhae Com.)
Radix Ipeca. pulv. - 1 gr.
Romania
C167(1).M.76(1). 1930.III
 
Pulvis opii. - 1 gr.
 
 
 
Sacchar. Lactis - 8 gr.
 
 
 
(Deutsches Arzneibuch 6)
Germany
C.167(1).M.76(1). 1930.III.
5. Indian Cigarettes of Grimault (Dr. Ph. Chapelle)
Belladonna leaves - 0.962 gm
Siam
C.L.302.1930.III. Annex I.
 
Cannabis indica
 
 
 
extract - 0.0005 gm.
 
 
 
Nitrate of potash - 0.033 gm.
 
 
6. Anti-dysentery mixture (British Dispensary, Bangkok)
Ol ricini-42.6188 ml.
Siam
C.L.502.1930.III Annex I.
 
Morphine hydrochlor. 0.1944 gm.
 
 
 
Flavoured emulsion to make - 340.95 ml.
 
 

PREPARATIONS LISTED IN THE "RECAPITULATORY LIST OF PREPARATIONS EXEMPTED FROM THE PROVISIONS OF THE 1925 INTERNATIONAL OPIUM CONVENTION BY APPLICATION OF ARTICLE 8 OF THAT CONVENTION" (C.114.M.54.1932.III).

WITH ADDED INFORMATION OF THE PHARMACOPOEIAL AUTHORITY AND THE GOVERNMENT PROPOSING EXEMPTION (C.H.839; C.167(1).M.76(1).1930.III; C.L.302.1930,III; Annex I.)

Preparation and pharmacopoeia (or other authority for the formula).

Formula

 

Government proposing exemption

 
OPIUM PREPARATIONS
 
 
1. Emplastrum Opii
Elemi
20 grammes
Germany
 
Terebinthina.
30
"
 
Cera flava
15
"
 
Olibanum pulvis
18
"
 
Benzoes pulvis
10
"
 
Opii pulvis
5
"
 
Balsamum peruvianum
2
"
2. Emplastrum Opii
Extract of opium
25 grammes
France
 
Refined elemi
25
"
 
Diachylon plaster with gum
50
"
3. Emplastrum Opii
Elemi
8 grammes
Poland
 
Terebinthinae communis
15
"
 
Cerae flavae
5
"
 
Olibani pulveratae
8
"
 
Benzoes pulveratae
4
"
 
Opii pulverati
2
"
 
Balsami peruviani
1 gramme
 
4. Emplastrum Opii
Opium, in very fine powder
10 grammes
Great Britain,
British Pharmacopoeia 1898 (not in later editions)
Resin plaster
90"
Union of South Africa,
 
 
 
Siam
5. Emplastrum Opii (see formula under 4) mixed with other plasters contained in the British Pharmacopoeia or British Pharmaceutical Codex
 
 
 
6. Linimentum Opii
Tincture of opium
500 millilitres
Great Britain,
British Pharmacopoeia 1914 (not in later editions)
Liniment of soap
500 "
Union of South Africa
7. Linimentum Opii (see formula under 6) mixed with any other Great Britain liniment of the British Pharmacopoeia or of the British Pharmaceutical Codex 1923.
 
 
 
8. Linimentum Opii ammoniatum
Ammoniated liniment of camphor
30
Great Britain,
British Pharmaceutical Codex,
Tincture of opium
30
Union of South Africa
 
Liniment of belladonna
5
 
 
Strong solution of ammonia
5
 
 
Liniment of soap to 100
 
 
9. Linimentum Opii. ammoniatum (see formula under 8) mixed with any other British Pharmacopoeia or British Pharmaceutical Codex liniment.
 
 
Great Britain
10. Pilulae Anti-diarrhoeae (Diarrhoea pills) Government Medical Depot
Camphor
0.0648 gramme
Siam
 
Lead acetate
0.013 "
 
 
Bismuth subnitrate
0.162 "
 
 
Tannic acid
0.0648 "
 
 
Opium powder
0.026 "
 
11. Pilulae Digitalis et Opii compositae
Digitalis leaves, in powder.
0.31* gramme
Great Britain,
 
Opium in powder
0.19 "
Union of South Africa
British Pharmaceutical Codex
Ipecacuanha root, in powder
0.13 "
 
1923 (not in British Pharmaceutical Codex 1934).
Quinine sulphate
0.78 "
 
 
Syrup of glucose, a sufficient quantity to make 12 pills
 
 
12. Paula Hydrargyri cum Creta et Opio
Mercury with chalk
0.78 gramme
Great Britain
British Pharmaceutical Codex 1923, not in 1934.
Compound powder of ipecacuanha**
0.78 "
Union of South Africa
 
Milk sugar, a sufficient quantity
 
 
 
Syrup of glucose, a sufficient quantity to make 12 pills
 
 
13. Pilulae Hydrargyri cum Opio
Mercury pill
3.89 grammes
Great Britain,
British Pharmaceutical Codex 1923, not in 1934
Opium, in powder To make 12 pills
0.19 gramme
Union of South Africa
14. Pilulae Hydrargyri bichlorati cum Opio Extracto.
Bichloride of mercury triturated
10 centigrammes
France
Pharmacopoeia Gallica (Not in Pharm. Gall. VII-1949)
Extract of opium
20 "
 
 
Extract of couchgrass
20 "
 
 
Liquorice root in powder, q.s. for 10 pills
 
 
15. Pilulae Hydrargyri cum Opio pulverato
Hydrargyrum iodatum freshly prepared
50 centigrammes
France
Phamacopoeia Gallica. (Not in Pharm. Gall. VII-1949)
Opium powder
20 "
 
 
Powdered liquorice
30 "
 
 
White honey, q.s. for 10 pills
 
 
16. Pilulae Ipecacuanhae cum Scillae
Compound powder of ipecacuanha**
30 grammes
Great Britain,
British Pharmacopoeia 1913, not in British Pharmacopoeia 1932
Squill, in powder
10 "
Union of South Africa,
 
Ammoniacum, in powder
10 "
Irish Free State,
 
Syrup of glucose, a sufficient quantity
 
Siam
 
Mix to form a mass dose 25 to 50 centigrammes
 
 
17. Pilulae Plumbi cum Opio
Lead acetate, in powder
80 grammes
Great Britain,
British Pharmacopoeia, 1914
Opium, in powder
12 "
Union of South Africa,
British Pharmaceutical Codex 1923
Syrup of glucose (or sufficient quantity to form a mass)
8 "
Siam
The preparation appears in the British Pharmaceutical Codex 1934, although somewhat different
Dose 12-25 centigrammes
 
 
 
British Pharmaceutical Codex, 1934:
 
 
 
Lead acetate, in powder.
2.60
 
 
Powdered opium
0.39
 
 
Syrup of liquid glucose, q.s. for 25 pills
 
 
18. Pilulae Terebinthinae compositae
Opium
0.5 gramme
Sweden
Pharmacopoeia Svecica Ed. X (1925)
Chinini sulfas
2 grammes
 
 
Styrax liquidus
2 "
 
 
Terebinthina laricina
8 "
 
 
Magnesii subcarbonas, a sufficient quantity to make 100 pills
 
 
19. Pulvis Ipecacuanhae compositus (Dover's powder)
British Pharmacopoeia 1914:
 
Great Britain
 
Ipecacuanhae root, in powder
10 grammes
Union of South Africa
British Pharmacopoeia 1914
Opium, in powder
10 "
Sudan, India, Bulgaria,
British Pharmacopoeia 1932 has changed the formula
Potassium sulphate, in powder
80 "
Siam, Irish Free State
 
Dose 3 to 10 decigrammes
 
 
 
British Pharmacopoeia 1932 and 1948:
 
 
 
Prepared ipecacuanhae
10 grammes
 
 
Opium, in powder
10 "
 
 
Lactose, finely powdered
10 "
 
20. Mixtures of Dover's powder (see formula under 19) with mercury nd chalk, aspirin, phenacetin, quinine and its salts, and sodium bicarbonate
 
 
Great Britain
21. Pulvis Kino compositus
Kino, in powder
75 grammes
Great Britain,
British Pharmacopoeia 1914
Opium, in powder
5 "
Union of South Africa,
British Pharmaceutical Codex 1934
Cinnamon bark, in powder
20 "
Sudan, Siam, Irish
 
Dose 3-10 decigrammes
 
Free State
22. Suppositoria Plumbi composita
Lead acetate, in powder
12.4 grammes
Great Britain,
British Pharmacopoeia 1914 (Not in British Pharmacopoeia 1932 or British Pharmaceutical Codex 1934)
Opium, in powder
0.8 gramme
Union of South Africa
 
Oil of theobroma, a sufficient quantity for 12 suppositories, each weighing about 1 gramme
 
 
23. Tabella Hydrargyri cure Opio
Mercurous chloride powder
0.065 gramme
Siam
(Royal Army Medical Service Department)
Antimony oxide powder
0.065 "
 
 
Ipecacuanha-root powder
0.065 "
 
 
Powdered Opium
0.065 "
 
 
Milk sugar
0.065 "
 
 
Gelatine solution, a sufficient quantity to make 1 tablet
 
 
24. Tabella Plumbi cum Opio
Sugar of lead
0.195 gramme
Siam
 
Powdered opium
0.065 "
 
 
Gelatine solution, a sufficient quantity to make 1 tablet
 
 
25. Tablettae Plumbi cum Opio
Lead acetate, in fine powder
 
Great Britain,
British Pharmaceutical Codex 1923
Opium, in powder
19.44 grammes
Union of South Africa
 
Refined sugar, in powder
3.24"
 
 
Ethereal solution of theobroma
6.48 "
 
 
Alcohol
3.60 mils
 
 
Make into 100 tablets
0.90 mil
 
26. Tablets for Coryza No. 2
Powdered opium
0.0043 gramme
Siam
(Frank S. Betz and-Co., U.S.A.)
Quinine sulph
0.022 "
 
 
Ammon. chlor
0.022 "
 
 
Camphor
0.022 "
 
 
Ext. belladonna leaves
0.0043 "
 
 
Ext. aconite root
0.0043 "
 
27. Tablets for Diarrhoea No. 2 (Sullivan)
Powdered opium
0.016 gramme
Siam
 
Camphor
0.016 "
 
(Frank S. Betz and Co., U.S.A)
Powdered ipecacuanha
0.008 "
 
 
Lead acetate
0.011 "
 
28. Tablets for Dysentery
Powdered opium
0.013 gramme
Siam
(H. K. Mulford Co., U.S.A.)
Powdered ipecacuanh
0.0648 "
 
 
Powdered calomel
0.0324 "
 
 
Lead acetate
0.0324 "
 
 
Bismuth betanaphthol
0.1944 "
 
29. Unguentum Gallae compositum
Galls in very fine powder
20
Great Britain
British Pharmaceutical Codex 1923
Extract of opium
4
Union of South Africa
 
Distilled water
16
Great Britain, Union of South Africa
 
Wool fat
10
 
 
Soft paraffin, yellow
50
 
30. Unguentum Gallae compositum (see formula under 29) mixed with other ointments and plasters contained in the British Pharmacopoeia or British Pharmaceutical Codex
 
 
Great Britain
31. Unguentum Gallae cum Opio
Gall ointment
92.5 grammes
Great Britain
British pharmacopoeia 1914
Opium in powder
7.5 "
Union of South Africa, India, Irish Free State, Siam
32. Unguentum Gallae cum Opio (see formula under 31) mixed with other ointments and plasters contained in the British Pharmacopoeia or British Pharmaceutical Codex
 
Great Britain
 
33.
Yatren-105 (Iodoxyquinoline-sulphonic acid) with 5 per cent opium admixture
 
Austria
 
MORPHINE PREPARATIONS
 
 
34. Cereoli Iodoformiet morphinae
 
In 1 bougie
 
British Pharmaceutical Codex 1923
Iodoform
0.320 gramme
Great Britain,
 
Morphine hydrochloride
0.016 "
Union of South Africa
 
Oil of theobroma, sufficient to fill 1-gramme mould
 
 
35. Caustic "Nerve Pastes"
Preparations containing, in addition to morphine salts, or morphine and cocaine salts, at least 25 per cent of arsenious acid, and made up with the requisite proportion of creosote or phenol to produce the consistency of a paste
 
Germany
36. Sterilised Solutions of Morphine and Atropine on condition they are delivered in Ampoules of 1.1c.c. having a maximum content of 2 per cent of morphine salts and a minimum content of 0.05 per cent of atropine salts
 
Germany
 
 
COCAINE PREPARATIONS
 
 
37. Bernatzik's Injections
(a) Hydrargyrum bicyanatum
0.03
Austria
 
Cocainum
0.02
 
 
(b) Hydrargyrum succinatum
0.03
 
 
Cocainum
0.01
 
38. Caustic "Nerve Pastes"
Preparations containing, in addition to cocaine salts or cocaine and morphine salts, at least 25 per cent of arsenious acid, and made up with the requisite proportion of creosote or phenol to produce the consistency of a paste
 
Germany
39. Cocaine and Atropine Tablets, with a content of not more than 0.0003 gramme of cocaine salts and not less than 0.0003 gramme of atropine salts to each tablet
Atropinum sulphuricum
0.0003 gramme
Germany
 
Cocainum hydrochloricum
0.0003 "
 
 
Mannite
0.003 "
 
 
Weight of one tablet Cocaine content 8.3 per cent
0.0036 gramme
 
40. Natrium biboracicum compositum cum Cocaino
In tablets, compressed tablets, lozenges, pastilles and the like, difficult to break up, and containing not more than 0.2 per cent of cocaine salts in conjunction with not less than 20 per cent borax and not-less than 20 per cent antipyrine, or some similar analgesic, and not more than 40 per cent of flavouring matter, Maximum weight of each tablet, etc., 1 gramme
 
Germany
41. Stila's Injections
(a) Hydrargyrum succinatum
0.03
Austria
 
Cocainum muriaticum
0.01
 
 
(b) Hydrargyrum succinatum
0.05
 
 
Cocainum muriaticum
0.03
 
42. Voice Tablets
Kalium chloricum
 
Austria
 
Borax
 
 
 
Cocainum
0.00025 gramme
 
 
Weight of one tablet
0.335 "
 
 
HEROIN PREPARATIONS
 
 
43. Elixir Camphorae compositum
Camphor
4 grains
Great Britain
 
Oil of anise
5 minims
 
 
Benzoic acid
6 grains
 
 
Diamorphine hydrochloride
4 "
 
 
Liquid extract of ipecacuanha
120 minims
 
 
Tincture of squill
1? fl. ounce
 
 
Simple syrup tp 20f. ounces
 
 
44. Elixir Diamorphinae et Terpini, with Apomorphine
Apomorphine hydrochloride
5 grains
Great Britain
 
Diamorphine hydrochloride
4 "
 
 
Terpin hydrate
44 "
 
 
Alcohol
10 fl.ounces
 
 
Glycerine
5 fl. "
 
 
Syrup of wild cherry to 20 fl. ounces
 
 
45. Linctus Diamorphinae cum Ipecacuanha
Liquid extract of ipecacuanha
120 minims
Great Britain
(British Pharmaceutical Codex 1934)
Diamorphine hydrochloride
4 grains
 
 
Tincture of hyoscyamus
1? fl. ounce
 
 
Spirit of chloroform
1? fl. ounce
 
 
Syrup of wild cherry
3 fl. "
 
 
Glycerine to 20 fl. ounces
 
 
46. Linctus Senegae compositus
Liquid extract of senega
1 fl. ounce
Great Britain
 
Liquid extract of squill
1 fl. "
 
 
Tartarated antimony
8 grains
 
 
Diamorphine hydrochloride GlycerineSimple syrup to 20 fl. ounces
4 grains
 
 
Glycerine
2 fl. ounces
 
 
Simple syrup to 20 fl. ounces
 
 
47. Linctus Thymi compositus
Diamorphine hydrochloride
4 grains
Great Britain
 
Apomorphine hydrochloride
5 "
 
 
Distilled water
1 fl. ounce
 
 
Liquid extract of thyme (I-I)
5 fl. ounces
 
 
Solution of tolu
1? ounce
 
 
Glycerine to 20 fl. ounces
 
 
 
DICODIDE PREPARATIONS
 
 
48. Cardiazol-Dicodide Solutions
Solutions containing not less than 10 per cent of cardiazol and not more than 0.5 per cent of dicodide salts
Germany
 
 
EUCODAL PREPARATIONS
 
 
49. Anti-Opium Tablets* (Dr. C. Gayetti, M.D.)
Eucodal
1 gramme
Siam
(Dr. C. Gayetti, M.D.)
Pulvis gentianae
35 grammes
 
 
Pulvis ipecacuanhae
20 "
 
 
Quinine sulphate
20 "
 
 
Caffeine
5 "
 
 
Sugar of milk
25 "
 
 
Mix up and make up 5-grain tablets
 
 
50. Tablets B.B. Compound (Dr. Lionel Verkey)
Berberis vulgaris powder
0.0324 gramme
Siam
(Dr. Lionel Verkey)
Nux vomica
0.013 "
 
 
Eucodal
0.0032 "
 
 
Ipecacuanha
0.0648 "
 
 
Rhubarb
0.013 "
 
 
Pulvis cinnamoni compositus
0.0324 "
 
 
Aromatic chalk
0.0032 "
 
51. Sterilised Solutions of Eucodal and Atropine having a maximum content of 2 per cent of eucodal salts and a minimum content of 0.05 per cent of atropine salts
 
 
Germany
*

Probably a misprint for 0.39 gramme

**

Formula No. 19.

*

In exempting this preparation from the operation of the Geneva Convention, the Health Committee expressed the wish that it should not be offered to the public under the name of "anti-opium:"

As far as exemption of cannabis preparations for external use is concerned, in its session of May 1939, the Health Committee,

"While maintaining, the conclusions adopted at its twenty-second session to the effect that preparations made from the extract and tincture of Indian hemp should be subjected to the measures of control set up by the 1925 Convention:

"Declares, however, that these conclusions do not apply to those of the said preparations which are capable only of external use."

CONCLUSIONS

The exemption of preparations under article 8 of the 1925 Convention would not appear to have succeeded in every respect, either in regard to the operation or in regard to the final list.

Many more preparations were rejected than were accepted by the Health Committee; many were proposed for exemption which were not accompanied by any clear formulas; others were proposed which were already exempt; some were proposed and then withdrawn, even after acceptance. A. number of preparations seem to have been accepted for exemption but their fate is not quite clear.

It is, suggested, that under the Unified Convention which is now being planned, the World Health Organization should classify all the official preparations containing narcotics, from the pharmacopoeias or other official formularies of the world, as:

  1. Coming under international control,

  2. Automatically exempt by the terms of the Convention; or

  3. Exempted by decision of the World Health Organization.

Such lists should be revised every few years, in accordance with any changes in the pharmacopoeias or other official books of pharmaceutical preparations. In this way a list of exempted preparations might be obtained which would have the greatest practical value; moreover, all the official preparations would be definitely classified, without the requirement of proposals from governments.