Cybercrime

Cybercrime is an evolving form of transnational crime. The complex nature of the crime as one that takes place in the border-less realm of cyberspace is compounded by the increasing involvement of organized crime groups. Perpetrators of cybercrime and their victims can be located in different regions, and its effects can ripple through societies around the world, highlighting the need to mount an urgent, dynamic and international response.

UNODC response

UNODC promotes long-term and sustainable capacity building in the fight against cybercrime through supporting national structures and action. Specifically, UNODC draws upon its specialized expertise on criminal justice systems response to provide technical assistance in capacity building, prevention and awareness raising, international cooperation, and data collection, research and analysis on cybercrime.

Open-ended Intergovernmental Expert Group on Cybercrime

Please click here for more information on the Expert Group and the Comprehensive Draft Study on Cybercrime, including the official sites for all EGM meetings, background information and the draft study.

Ad hoc committee established by GA resolution 74/247

Information on the open-ended ad hoc intergovernmental committee of experts, representative of all regions, to elaborate a comprehensive international convention on countering the use of information and communications technologies for criminal purposes established by the General Assembly.

Global Programme on Cybercrime

The UNODC Global Programme on Cybercrime provides focused technical assistance for capacity building, prevention and awareness raising, international cooperation and analysis on the phenomenon, principally in developing countries. The Programme is based within the UNODC Organized Crime Branch, part of the Division for Treaty Affairs. [more]

UNODC Cybercrime Tools

Please see here for tools on cybercrime.

Other relevant activities

Please see here for other relevant activities related to the fight against cybercrime.

Tweets by Neil Walsh, Global Programme on Cybercrime