Special events

During the sixth session of the Conference of the States Parties to the United Nations Convention against Corruption in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation, 2 to 6 November 2015, 33 on-site special events will be held at the Lenexpo Exhibition Complex, organized by Governments, Departments and Agencies of the United Nations, Intergovernmental and Non-Governmental Organizations and UNODC.
Please see below the Programme of the on-site Special Events. [Click on the event's title for more information]:

 

Events Calendar
     

Monday, 2 November 2015

12.30-14.30
Conference Room B

Anti-corruption in small island developing States (SIDS): What is there? And what else is needed?

Organizer: UNODC

UNODC and UNDP facilitated a special event on anti-corruption reform in Small Island Developing States (SIDS). Panellists highlighted the contextual challenges and possible solutions to addressing corruption in a cost-effective and sustainable manner through national anti-corruption coordination and specific reforms in SIDS. Lessons learned in combating corruption in the context of procurement processes were noted as an example. Panellists further elaborated on the manner in which technical assistance had been provided to SIDS on a thematic basis (e.g. money-laundering) and through South-South knowledge sharing. Finally, Mauritius highlighted opportunities and priorities of anti-corruption reform in SIDS and presented a resolution on SIDS that it had tabled for the consideration and consequent adoption by the Conference.

For additional information, please contact:

Claudia Sayago
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch
UNODC
claudia.sayago@unodc.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Chuah Chang Man, Malaysia
Kaushik Goburdhun, Mauritius ICAC
Phil Mason, UK
Dirk Harrison, Jamaica

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12.30-14.00
Conference Room C
MERGED

How can the Anti-Corruption Campus help achieve sustainable development?

Organizer: IACA

Merged with the High-level Meeting: Countering corruption and the implementation of Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals, Tuesday, 3 November 2015, 13.30-15.00, Conference Room B

How can anti-corruption education contribute to the achievement of the Post-2015 Development Agenda and new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)? What are the next steps leading from SDGs to action after the UN summit in New York in September? This side-event organized by IACA will feature several high-level speakers.

For additional information, please contact:

Simona Marin
IACA
simona.marin@iaca.int

Agenda:

Presentations:

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12.00-14.00
Conference Room D

Making the review of the Convention against Corruption more effective

Organizer: UNCAC Coalition, Switzerland, TI

Switzerland, the UNCAC Coalition and Transparency International organized a special event which included presentations by representatives of States Parties, civil society and UNODC, and focused on proposals on how to possibly further enhance the effectiveness of the UNCAC Review Mechanism.

For additional information, please contact:

Manzoor Hasan
UNCAC Coalition
mhasan56@gmail.com

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Mirella Dummar Frahi, UNODC

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15.30-18.00
Conference Room B

Making public procurement public: Public-private cooperation to promote integrity and transparency in the public procurement system

Organizer: UN Global Compact, TI Secretariat, TI Russia (tbc), Global Compact Local Network Russia

The UN Global Compact and Transparency International organized a panel discussion on public procurement and standards for businesses to reduce corruption. Panellists highlighted the benefits of open data, and noted that independent monitoring and a well-functioning justice system were essential to curb corruption in the public procurement process. Furthermore, voluntary multi-stakeholder agreements were highlighted as a good practice to improve oversight and enhance transparency and involvement of both the public and private sectors in the process. Following expert presentations, participants discussed strategies to ensure cost-effective measures to deliver good quality procurement services. Generally, participants agreed that the benefits of e-procurement outweigh its costs. It was further noted that transparency was crucial to detect corruption but that it had to be complemented with corrective measures in order to maintain public confidence and deter further acts of corruption. UNODC facilitated a round table discussion on costs-benefits of improved transparency.

For additional information, please contact:

Olajobi Makinwa
Chief
Anti-Corruption & Transparency and Africa Strategy
makinwa@un.org

Moramay Navarro
Programme Manager
Anti-Corruption & Transparency
navarroperez@unglobalcompact.org

Agenda:

Presentations:

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15.00-16.30
Conference Room D

UNODC regional programme for Eastern Africa

Organizer: UNODC – RSAME and ROEA

The event introduced the new UNODC Regional Programmes for Eastern and Western Africa which are due to be implemented as of 2016. The presentations led to discussion about the importance of anti-corruption efforts across UNODC’s work on transnational organized crime, terrorism prevention, crime prevention and criminal justice, and health in Eastern and Western Africa. The event further highlighted the importance of work by UNODC to combat corruption at both regional and national levels in Africa.

For additional information, please contact:

Jenna Dawson-Faber
Regional Section for African and the Middle East
UNODC
jenna.dawson-faber@unodc.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Samuel De Jaegere, UNODC
Jose Vila del Castillo, UNODC

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Tuesday, 3 November 2015

10.00-13.00
Conference Room A

Practice of public private partnership in anti-corruption

Organizer: Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation, The Institute of Legislation and Comparative Law

A special event was organized by the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation, UNODC, and the Institute of Legislation and Comparative Law under the Government of the Russian Federation. Attendees discussed approaches to public-private partnerships in anti-corruption, the participation of Russian business in international anti-corruption activities, the progress made in implementing the Russian Anti-Corruption Charter for Business, and the role of Chambers of Commerce and Industry in fostering public-private dialogue to prevent and combat corruption. The event also featured a presentation of the outcome of the Conference on Public-Private Partnership in the Fight against Corruption, which took place in Moscow from 26 to 27 March 2015. Speakers included the heads of UNODC, the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation, and the International Anti-Corruption Academy (IACA).

For additional information, please contact:

Aleksandr Sergeevitch Alpatov
Chief Expert
Department of Entrepreneurship and Services
Chamber of Commerce and Industry
Russian Federation
alpatov@tpprf.ru

Agenda:
English/Russian

Presentations:
Moscow Conference Report
Цирин Артем Михайлович
Капустин Анатолий Яковлевич

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11.00-12.30
Conference Room B

Addressing the nexus between illegal wildlife and forestry trades and corruption

Organizer: UNODC

This high-level event was an urgent call for immediate action to the anti-corruption world. All presenters stressed that corruption underpins all illicit activities facilitating organized wildlife and forest crime. If both corruption and wildlife and forest crime are not immediately addressed, many species of wild fauna and flora will soon become extinct and the criminal networks will continue acting with impunity. The event highlighted that appropriate international legal instruments are in place to tackle both crimes, such as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), UNCAC and the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (UNTOC). It further emphasized that there are already many good actions on the ground and that there is an increased determination among Member States to treat this issue as a priority, as demonstrated by the example provided by the Government of Kenya. Notwithstanding, the speakers emphasized that the scale and scope of corruption in this area requires far more coordinated prevention efforts and that there is a strong necessity to address corruption through the entire chain (poaching, selling, transportation, end markets). The States were called to adopt risk approaches and integrity policies at the institutional level that would serve as a deterrent to corruption in the wildlife and forestry sector and would be mainstreamed into the broader national anti-corruption efforts.

For additional information, please contact:

Tim Steele
Senior Adviser and Anti-Corruption Mentor
UNODC
tim.steele@unodc.org

Agenda:
English

Flyer

Presentations:
Ian Russel, GIZ

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09.00-17.30
Conference Room C

The Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative: Close to a decade of international efforts in support of the recovery of stolen assets

Organizer: World Bank

The joint World Bank/UNODC Stolen Asset Recovery (StAR) Initiative organized a full-day special event dedicated to asset recovery. Over the course of four sessions, StAR provided information on its activities, thus creating a platform for StAR clients, partners and supporters to review the achievements and lessons learned, and outline the challenges and expectations for the future.
The first session focused on StAR’s country engagements, its achievements and challenges as well as proposals for future direction in the renewed programme. In addition to a presentation by StAR, representatives from Tunisia and Mongolia provided feedback on how StAR has helped their respective efforts and outlined their expectations for the future.
The second session, which was co-organized with Brazil, featured presentations by Brazil, StAR, the United States and Colombia. The session aimed at improving discussions about the use of civil and administrative proceedings against corruption, with focus on international cooperation based on such proceedings and the civil claims brought by a State Party in foreign jurisdictions, including those in which it appears as “partie civile” in foreign criminal proceedings.
The third session showcased ongoing work carried out by StAR, UNODC and Interpol on knowledge products and resources to practitioners and policymakers. The session included presentations by StAR on various resources and Interpol on the newly minted “Silver Notice” to be used for asset recovery, as well as a UNODC update on ongoing work on management and disposal of returned assets.
The fourth session, which was co-organized with Switzerland, highlighted a project of the Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs/Directorate for Public International Law (FDFA/DIL) in collaboration with the International Centre for Asset Recovery (ICAR) of the Basel Institute on Governance and with the support of StAR. This project seeks to establish best practices for the efficient recovery of illicit assets of politically exposed persons (PEPs). The panel, moderated by Switzerland, explored two commentaries to the guidelines focusing on pre-mutual legal assistance (MLA) requests and MLA process respectively, through presentations by StAR and ICAR and commentaries by Sri Lanka and Peru as requesting and UK and Liechtenstein as requested States.
Discussions during these sessions will feed into the technical work to be carried out during the upcoming second cycle of the UNCAC Implementation Review Mechanism devoted to the review of Chapter V on asset recovery.

For additional information, please contact:

Elsa Gopala Krishnan
The Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative egopalakrishnan@worldbank.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Richard Miron, StAR
Jean-Pierre Brun, StAR
Jaime Andrés Gnecco Daza, Colombia
Julia Pilgrim, UNODC
Boni Soares, Brazil
Jean-Pierre Brun and Shervin Majlessi, StAR

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09.30-11.30
Conference Room D

Fighting corruption through open Government

Organizer: South Africa, Open Government Partnership Steering Committee members including France and Brazil

South Africa hosted and moderated a special event on the Open Government Partnership (OGP). The speakers included representatives from Brazil, Transparency International, the Africa Center for Open Governance and UNODC.
The event provided an opportunity to present the Open Government Partnership, an initiative established in 2011 by eight countries and now assembling 69 member countries around the world. Currently chaired by South Africa and co-chaired by France, OGP promotes transparency in government, civic participation and accountability. It was highlighted that, under the initiative, governments develop and implement national open government strategies and many of those comprise anti-corruption commitments.
Speakers emphasised the role that UNCAC can play in supporting OGP, given that the Convention lays out legally binding obligations on transparency in public procurement, transparency in public finances, and transparency in beneficial ownership of corporate entities, among others. At the same time, OGP can contribute to the implementation of these provisions, contained in Chapter II of the Convention. Speakers emphasized the mutually reinforcing linkages between OGP and UNCAC, especially in the upcoming 2nd UNCAC review cycle, as countries will be reviewed on Chapter II. The discussion focused on eligibility criteria for membership to OGP, the role of civil society in supporting OGP, good practices in implementing OGP commitments, and extending OGP membership in Africa and Asia.

For additional information, please contact:

Qinisile Delwa
Ministry of Public Service and Administration
South Africa
qinisiled@dpsa.gov.za

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Gillian Dell, Transparency International
Roberta Solis, Brazil
Samuel De Jaegere, UNODC

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14.00-16.30
Conference Room A

Protection of business from corruption practices: the national experience of the Business Ombudsman

Organizer: Presidential Commissioner for Enterpreuners’ Rights (Russia); CoE; Russian Prosecutor General’s Office

During the event, the experience of the Business Ombudsman institution was presented as a good practice example of cooperation between business sector, society and the Government to protect entrepreneurs from corrupt practices and improve the business climate.
The event provided information about the institution of the Business Ombudsman in the Russian Federation, its activities and results, and presented a successful example of international anti-corruption cooperation, namely the joint CoE, EU and the Russian Business Ombudsman project «Protection of the Rights of Entrepreneurs in the Russian Federation from Corrupt Practices» (PRECOP RF).
Best practices of cooperation between social and legal societies and the Government in protecting business sector from corruption was demonstrated using the example of Centre for public procedures called «Business against corruption». The best practices involving pro bono lawyers were also shared.

For additional information, please contact:

Anuchin Leonid
Adviser of the Russian Business Ombudsman anuchin@ombudsmanbiz.ru

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Dina Krylova, Ombudsman Office
Peter Sich, Councel of Europe
Alexander Abrosimov, Ombudsman Office
Andrey Porfiriev, Ombudsman Office
Guillauma Parent, Councel of Europe
Andrey Yakovlev, Higher School of Economics

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13.30-15.00
Conference Room B

Countering corruption and the implementation of Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals

Organizer: UNODC, IACA, DESA,UNDP, Global Compact

Opening the event, the Executive Director of UNODC hailed the identification of corruption and bribery as a target under Goal 16 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): "UNODC very much welcomes the international community's recognition that Goal 16 on justice and building effective, accountable and inclusive institutions is cross-cutting in its scope and impact". The special event attracted other high-level speakers, including the Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs, and the Minister of Justice of Lebanon and Chair of the Arab Anti-Corruption and Integrity Network.

For additional information, please contact:

Jason Reichelt
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch
UNODC
reichelt@unodc.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:

-

12.30-13.30
Conference Room D

Transparency and anti-corruption structural reforms of Mexico

Organizer: Mexico

During the special event, the Ministry of Public Administration of Mexico presented structural reforms undertaken in Mexico to enhance transparency, accountability and access to information, including in public procurement. In his presentation, the Minister of Public Administration emphasized the Mexican Government’s determination to improve efficiency in public administration and minimize opportunities for corruption, and explained the main legislative reforms to enhance transparency. The Director of the Division for Treaty Affairs of UNODC highlighted Mexico’s active role during the negotiations of UNCAC and its support to and participation in the UNCAC Review Mechanism. He welcomed concrete outcomes resulting from UNODC’s work with the Ministry of Public Administration in support of anti-corruption reforms in Mexico. A Mexican Senator emphasized the importance of new enacted legislation extending transparency and reporting requirements to a wide number of officials. She highlighted the consultative process undertaken during the legislative drafting and called for enhanced protection of reporting persons to complement existing reforms in support of a robust anti-corruption framework.

For additional information, please contact:

Teresa Gómez del Campo Gurza
Ministry of Public Administration
Mexico
tgomez@funcionpublica.gob.mx

Jaime Cerdio Moisés
Ministry of Public Administration
Mexico
jcerdio@funcionpublica.gob.mx

Valentina Valdez Jasso
Ministry of Public Administration
Mexico
vvaldez@funcionpublica.gob.mx

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Virgilio Andrade Martinez, Mexico
Laura Rojas, Mexico

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16.00-17.30
Conference Room B

High-level anniversary event on youth for anti-corruption

Organizer: UNDP Thailand

The special event was organized jointly by UNODC and UNDP. The Panel, moderated by the UNDP Governance and Peacebuilding Head of Practice, included speakers from Albania, Thai Youth Anti-Corruption Network, Youth for Transparency in the Education Sector in the Republic of Moldova, “YouStink” Movement (Lebanon), and UNDP-UNODC joint anti-corruption project.
The Panel discussed tools and best practices in promoting participation of young citizens in the prevention of corruption, in line with article 13 of UNCAC. The speakers highlighted innovative ways to empower youth and facilitate collaboration in designing and implementing anti-corruption initiatives, and called for a more proactive engagement of youth in political debates and in raising awareness on the impact of corruption on the public services and the larger society. Speakers described how grassroots movements, such as the Thai Youth Network Against Corruption and the “You Stink” Movement, managed to enhance awareness and participation of youth through online and offline tools. The “You Stink” Movement produced a large mass movement against corruption in Lebanon by highlighting corruption and mismanagement in the system of garbage collection and disposal. Social media was highlighted as a powerful way to raise awareness and create the political space for anti-corruption in the political arena.
The UNODC and UNDP programmes supporting the youth’s understanding of and participation in anti-corruption activities in Thailand and the Pacific region were presented. The speakers highlighted the need for grassroots level engagement on topics of interests to the local communities.

For additional information, please contact:

Shelley Inglis
United Nations Development Programme
Istanbul Regional Hub
Shelley.inglis@undp.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Youth and Anticorruption, UNDP
Natthaya Rotjanadamrongkool, Thailand
Gabriela Ojog, Moldova
Luisa Senibulu, UNODC

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15.00-17.00
Conference Room D

Effective protection of reporting persons: Experiences, trends and new resource tools

Organizer: UNODC, OECD

A new UNODC knowledge product, the Resource Guide on Good Practices in the Protection of Reporting Person was launched during the event organized jointly by UNODC and the Organisation for Economic-Cooperation and Development (OECD). The guide had been produced as a response to the high number of recommendations made and technical assistance needs identified in country reports under the UNCAC Implementation Review Mechanism. It highlights good practices and learning points in the protection of reporting persons.
The event brought together experts from across the globe to present their experiences and share their expertise. A representative from Korea explained the whistleblower protection system of his country, how this system had been developed and how the continuous analysis of cases and practices was used to identify achievements as well as points for improvement.
A representative Ireland presented Ireland’s move towards a single, comprehensive regime for whistle-blower protection through the 2014 Protected Disclosure Act, which applies to workplace related reporting in both, the public and the private sector. He further spoke about the need to balance the interests and rights of the different stakeholders involved and highlighted notable features of the law, which, for instance, does not have a “good faith” requirement and no public interest test.
The UN Global Compact enriched the discussion with views from the private sector and highlighted that whistleblowing was still too often seen in a negative light. To promote reporting systems in the private sector and to highlight examples, UN Global Compact is currently developing jointly with multiple private sector entities a publication in whistleblowing systems in the private sector which is estimated to be launched in June 2016.
OECD concluded the panel by elaborating on a study that it is currently carrying out on public and private sector whistleblower protection in OECD countries, and which is due to be published in March 2016. Preliminary findings had shown an increase in the adoption of dedicated whistleblower protection laws in the past five years, but also that the level and form of implementation varied. Some countries had dedicated whistleblower protection laws, others included relevant provisions in anti-corruption laws, public service or sector specific laws, labour laws or criminal codes. Only approximately one third of the countries had effective private sector whistleblower protection.
Countries were encouraged to implement existing international standards on public and private sector whistleblower protection and to develop measures and studies to assess the effectiveness of whistleblower protection frameworks.

For additional information, please contact:

Constanze von Söhnen
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch
UNODC
constanze.vonsoehnen@unodc.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Chae-soo Lim, Republic of Korea
Michael Perkins, Ireland
Constanze von Söhnen, UNODC

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Wednesday, 4 November 2015

9.30-11.00
Conference Room A

How can open data prevent and fight corruption?

Organizer: UNDP, Serbia, Mexico, UNODC

The UNDP hosted special event was moderated by its Governance and Peacebuilding Head of Practice. The speakers included the Minister of Public Administration of Serbia, UNODC’s Director of the Division for Treaty Affairs, and representatives from Transparency International Slovakia, Societal Analysis Public Association of Kyrgyzstan, and UNODC. The event highlighted the importance of open data, i.e. data that is not only public, but also easily accessible and comparable. Open data is encouraged by UNCAC through requirements for access to information policies, transparency in public finances and public procurement, and asset disclosure, among others. Open data provides an opportunity for Governments, civil society and the private sector to collaborate in preventing and combating corruption.
The panel underscored the essential role of open data in combatting corruption and supporting the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. Whereas many Governments used to consider government held data to be secret by default, nowadays more and more Governments consider such data to be open by default. The panel shared good practices from Serbia, Kyrgyzstan and Africa, such as open government portals with procurement data, publication of asset declarations and digitalisation of all government documents. The speakers also highlighted remaining challenges in adopting open data policies and making data user-friendly. Speakers emphasized that open data is only useful to the extent that citizens, civil society and investigative journalists can analyse and engage with the data. On the whole, the speakers agreed that there is momentum for open data movements at the national and international level. The topic is on the agenda of the G20 Working Group on Anti-Corruption. It is also supported by the Open Government Partnership in 69 countries.

For additional information, please contact:

Shelley Inglis
UNDP Regional Hub
Shelley.Inglis@undp.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Rita Karasartova, Societal Analysis Public Association,Kyrgyzstan
Samuel de Jaegere, UNODC
Video

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10.30-12.00
Conference Room B

The Brazilian “Car Wash Operation”: Case study on financial investigation techniques and international cooperation

Organizer: Brazil

Corruption cases are often committed by powerful politicians or high-ranking officials, which makes it difficult for investigators to obtain the cooperation of witnesses and suspects. Investigation of large-scale corruption cases demands perseverance, knowledge, experience, expertise and organizational strength. In this sense, Brazilian prosecutors will present their experience with investigation during Brazil´s well known Car Wash Operation.

For additional information, please contact:

Vivian Coelho
UNODC
vivian.coelho@unodc.org

Agenda:

Presentations:
Nicolao Dino, Brazil

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9.30-12.30
Conference Room D

Anti-corruption education and training for implementing the Convention against Corruption

Organizer: IACA

The special event, organized by the International Anti-Corruption Academy (IACA), and moderated by its Dean and Executive Secretary, included speakers from IACA’s Master in Anti-Corruption Studies Academic Programme Consortium, Northeastern University, the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, Lexchange, Compliance Management Systems, and IACA.
The event highlighted the importance of anti-corruption education and training in the implementation of UNCAC, particularly with regard to its Chapters on prevention and asset recovery. Panellists, representing the academic community and practitioners that had participated in the IACA’s Master Programme, talked about the role of education in the fight against corruption, highlighting how knowledge, research and analysis contribute to anti-corruption. The creation of broad anti-corruption movements that include all stakeholders was highlighted as a necessity for promoting integrity and ethics in the public and private sectors, and the speaker stressed the importance of education and continuous training in creating these movements. The speakers also provided insights to the IACA’s Master in Anti-Corruption Studies Programme and the thematic trainings and workshops developed by IACA for enhancing implementation of UNCAC. The event set the stage for discussion on the significance of these activities and also argued for their relevance in efforts to achieve sustainable development in the framework of the post 2015 agenda.

For additional information, please contact:

Simona Marin
IACA
simona.marin@iaca.int

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Nicos Passas, Northeastern University
Video: IACA Masters in Anti-Corruption Studies

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12.00-14.00
Conference Room A

Partenariat public privé et la lutte contre la corruption

Organizer: Morocco

Morocco organized a special event on public-private partnerships. Presided by the President of the National Anti-Corruption Institution of Tunisia, the event brought together the Minister for Civil Service and Modernisation of the Public Administration of Morocco, Executive Director of UNODC, as well as public and private sector experts from Morocco, India and Mexico.
The organisers reminded participants about the Marrakech Declaration on the prevention of corruption and States parties’ commitment therein to involve civil society and the private sector in the implementation of anti-corruption programmes and the necessity to share best practises on public-private partnerships. These programmes do not only help prevent and combat corruption, but also help secure foreign investors and improve the national economic investment climate.
The panel highlighted the importance of public-private partnerships for economic growth, delivery of public services and equitable redistribution of resources. It shared numerous experiences on constitutional, legislative and regulatory reforms aimed at promoting public-private partnerships in India, Mexico and Morocco. In the public sector, actions have been taken to modernize the administration through access to information, digitalization, public procurement regulation and oversight by civil society. Speakers also emphasized the high risk and cost of corruption for the private sector. When corruption is uncovered, contracts may be cancelled and private companies may suffer huge financial losses. Hence, anti-corruption plans, compliance programmes and integrity pacts for private companies make good business sense. Moreover, the private sector can also stimulate reforms in the public sector, for example, by promoting access to information and whistle-blower protection. In the discussion, participants shared experiences from France, Haiti, Sri Lanka, the UN Global Compact, the UNCAC Coalition, and Transparency International. Some participants also called for more transparency in beneficial ownership of all companies awarded with public contracts.

For additional information, please contact:

Ahmed Laamoumri
Ministère de la Fonction Publique et de la
Modernisation de l’Administration
a.laamoumri@mmsp.gov.ma

Agenda:
English
French

Presentations:
Moha Bousta, Morocco
Mohammed Bachir Rachdi, Morocco

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12.30-14.00
Conference Room B

ACAD Initiative: Combating corruption through education

Organizer: UNODC / ACAD

Under the auspices of UNODC's successful Anti-Corruption Academic Initiative (ACAD), a collaborative academic project which seeks to support academics to teach and conduct research on corruption-related issues, renowned professors discussed successes and challenges in teaching anti-corruption. The event was opened by the Executive Director of UNODC who emphasized that it was crucial to shape the minds of the next generations of leaders and thinkers as part of overall efforts to eliminate corruption. He highlighted UNODC’s role in supporting efforts to develop and integrate anti-corruption education in universities and other academic institutions around the globe. During the event, participants were updated on the significant progress made under the ACAD Initiative over the past years. This included also a presentation on the outcomes of the ACAD Symposium, organized in Moscow in partnership with the Moscow State Institute for International Affairs (MGIMO) and the Rule of Law and Anti-Corruption Centre (ROLAC) of Qatar immediately prior to the Conference of the States Parties. Over 100 academics and representatives from around the globe had made a number of recommendations, including the particular the need to encourage competent educational authorities to ensure proper accreditation for anti-corruption courses, and for ACAD to expand towards promoting ethics and integrity learning in secondary and primary schools.

For additional information, please contact:

Maria Adomeit
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch
UNODC
maria.adomeit@unodc.org

Ronan O’Laoire
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch
UNODC
ronan.olaoire@unodc.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Candice Welsch, UNODC

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13.30-15.00
Conference Room D

Corruption risk assessments: Current approaches and emerging practices

Organizer: UNODC, UNDP, Regional Anticorruption Initiative

The event brought together practitioners from international organizations and UNCAC States parties, who had interest in the approaches to assessing and managing corruption risks. Examples of methodologies used to identify and address corruption risks at organizational, sectoral and national level were presented along with examples of how the practical application of these methodologies has helped to strengthen the integrity of the organization or sector.
UNDP’s Global Anti-corruption Initiative shared UNDP’s approach to and experience in measuring corruption. World Bank/Stolen Assets Recovery (StAR) Initiative described World Bank’s approach to identifying and managing money laundering risks at national level. UNODC presented a methodology for assessing corruption risks at organizational level, and the Regional Anti-corruption Initiative (RAI) presented its recently developed tools on corruption risk management and corruption proofing of legislation.
Approaches to further exploring how corruption risk assessment could be utilized as a diagnostic tool for developing anti-corruption policies and as a monitoring and evaluation tool for tracking the implementation of anti-corruption strategies were discussed.

For additional information, please contact:

Constantine Parlicarsky
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch
UNODC
constantine.palicarsky@unodc.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Anga Timilsina, UNDP
Constantine Palicarsky, UNODC
Jean Pesme, the World Bank
Radu Cotici, RAI

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15.00-16.30
Conference Room A

The UNCAC and the ACAC: Synergies and implications for anti-corruption legislation in the Arab Region

Organizer: UNDP, UNODC, Central Authority for Corruption Prevention in Morocco (ICPC), LAS

The special event presented a comparative analysis of UNCAC and the Arab Convention against Corruption (ACAC), along with an update on the status of related laws in Arab countries and the linkages between the two Conventions and the 2030 Development Agenda, in particular Goal 16. Participants included ministers and representatives from national authorities and civil society organizations. Discussions focused on related challenges and needs for Arab countries, and reiterated the commitment to deepen regional collaboration on common priorities in the framework of the Arab Anti-Corruption and Integrity Network (ACINET). Participants also stressed the need to deepen UNCAC implementation efforts, namely in relation to corruption prevention and international cooperation, while also supporting the implementation of the ACAC based on a process or mechanism to monitor its implementation.

For additional information, please contact:

Karine Badr
UNDP
aciac@undp.org
karine.badr@undp.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Zassir Chokairi, ICPC

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15.00-17.00
Conference Room B

Tackling corruption through public-private dialogue

Organizer: UNODC, GIZ, Brunei Darussalam, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Cambodia, Sweden, UN Global Compact, World Bank, Siemens Integrity Initiative

The panel was co-organized by the UNODC and Alliance for Integrity (AfIn). Guest speakers included representatives of Malaysia, Cambodia, Brazil, AfIn and ADVA.
The Panellists discussed how to engineer an open and frank public-private dialogue on corruption and business integrity. The discussion highlighted that as Governments are embarking on rigorous anti-corruption reforms based on the recommendations from their UNCAC reviews, also the private sector is scaling up its efforts by cooperating with industry peers to level the playing field and create fair competition based on the collective action principle. New collective action initiatives, such as integrity pledges and various types of working groups and multi-stakeholders committees, are being created.
The speakers discussed the public sector activities in Cambodia, Malaysia and Brazil aimed at promoting cooperation between the public sector and the businesses in fighting corruption. The panel also explored the incentives for companies to participate in a structured public-private dialogue and highlighted the success factors and challenges of collective action initiatives in the area of business integrity. The Panel contributed to defining the role of state actors, businesses, civil society and development partners in the promotion of business integrity, and agreed on practical recommendations to foster sustainable public-private dialogue for combating corruption and develop trust between the business community and the public sector. The necessity of engaging specialized NGOs in the public-private dialogue, creating the right set of incentives highlighting the benefits of anti-corruption for businesses and producing detailed strategies and guidelines for the public private dialogue were highlighted as priorities.

For additional information, please contact:

Agenda:

Presentations:
Francesco Checchi, UNODC
Flyer

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15.30-17.00
Conference Room C

Convention against Corruption and civil society participation in anti-corruption efforts: Taking stock and looking ahead

Organizer: Norway / CIVICUS / ECNL / TI / UNCAC Coalition / UNDP / OSCE Tajikistan

Transparency International, together with Norway, Netherlands and civil society organizations, facilitated a special event on the participation of civil society in support of UNCAC. Speakers called for legislative reform to implement UNCAC provision on illicit enrichment and highlighted the importance of civil society’s engagement at country level during the UNCAC review process. The important role of civil society in preventing and fighting corruption was emphasized as well as the negative impact of corruption on gender. Panelists also discussed funding sources and their impact on civil society’s work. Some participants noted the importance of monitoring work with civil society at municipal level rather than merely at central level. Guest speakers included representatives from Transparency International, CIVICUS Alliance, UNDP and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE).

For additional information, please contact:

Gillian Dell
Transparency International
gdell@transparency.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:

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15.30-17.00
Conference Room D

Effective national anti-corruption strategies

Organizer: UNODC, Brazil, GIZ

The importance of effective anti-corruption policies is enshrined in Article 5 of UNCAC. However, many States have failed to properly take into account challenges during both the development and implementation stages of a strategy, which often undermines its effectiveness and overall impact on fighting corruption. This event, organized by UNODC, offered an opportunity to highlight effective national experiences, in developing and implementing anti-corruption strategies and to present UNODC’s latest knowledge product, “National Anti-Corruption Strategies – A Practical Guide for Development and Implementation”.
The event was opened by the Director of the Division for Treaty Affairs of UNODC, who highlighted that the overarching theme of the guide was that strategy drafters must strike a balance between ambition and realism, and that the purpose of the special event was to allow participants to hear and discuss practical experiences from those who have developed and implemented anti-corruption strategies in reality.
During the event, speakers from Brazil and Kenya presented their countries experience in developing and implementing anti-corruption strategies. Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) shared their approach to anti-corruption and to providing technical assistance for the development effective and coordinated anti-corruption policies.

For additional information, please contact:

Constantive Palicarsky
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch
UNODC
constantine.palicarsky@unodc.org

Ronan O’Laoire
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch
UNODC
ronan.olaoire@unodc.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Carolina Yumi. MoJ, Brazil
Constantine Palicarsky, UNODC
Johannes Ferguson, GIZ
Roberta Solis. CGU, Brazil

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Thursday, 5 November 2015

10.00-13.30
Conference Room A

6th Forum of Parliamentarians

Organizer: GOPAC

UNODC’s Executive Director delivered the event’s keynote statement. He highlighted the importance of partnerships, acknowledging the Global Organization of Parliamentarians Against Corruption (GOPAC) as an important partner in the fight against corruption. The first panel on ‘Partnerships to Curtail Corruption in the Pacific’ focused on the engagement of Parliamentarians and the role that they can play to promote the ratification of UNCAC and contribute to its implementation in the Pacific region. Experience was drawn on from the UNDP-UNODC Pacific Regional Anti-Corruption Project and GOPAC Oceania’s activities to illustrate best practices and common challenges, with the specific experiences of the Cook Islands and Kingdom of Tonga highlighted. The second panel on ‘Prosecuting Grand Corruption: Let us bring them to justice’ advanced GOPAC and Transparency International’s aim of pursuing international legal instruments and strategies to apprehend, prosecute, judge, and sentence perpetrators of grand corruption. National and international measures to address grand corruption were discussed, as well as to ensure that remedies are provided to victims and the proceeds of crime returned, such as through the UNODC-World Bank Stolen Asset Recovery (StAR) Initiative. The International Commission against Impunity in Guatemala was highlighted as an example of where grand corruption is being addressed.

For additional information, please contact:

Emilie Lemieux
GOPAC
Emilie.lemieux@gopacnetwork.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
John Hyde, GOPAC - Presentation 1
John Hyde, GOPAC - Presentation 2
John Hyde, GOPAC - Presentation 3
Jose Briz, Guatemala
Lord Fusitu'a, Tonga - Presenatation
Lord Fusitu'a, Tonga - Video
Luisa Senibulu,UNDP
Mary Jane Ncube, TI Zimbabwe

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10.30-12.00
Conference Room C

Cooperation agreements as important tools for investigation and asset recovery: Brazil’s experience and best practices

Organizer: Brazil

The driving motivation for the use of cooperating defendants is the need to combat organized crime more effectively. The cooperating defendantʼs admission of personal guilt is not the primary goal, the idea is to use this cooperating defendant to develop evidence to prosecute other individuals, usually co-conspirators and facilitate asset recovery. During the event, articles 37 of the UN Convention against Corruption 26 of the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime will be discussed, and Brazil´s prosecutors will give real case examples of the importance of cooperation agreements in corruption investigations.

For additional information, please contact:

Vivian Coelho
UNDP
vivian.coelho@unodc.org

Agenda:

Presentations:
Ubiratan Cayetta, Brazil

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10.30-12.00
Conference Room D

Corruption challenges to the looting, trafficking and sale of cultural heritage

Organizer: UNODC / Italy / Jordan / UNESCO / INTERPOL

This event highlighted the serious loss of cultural property and heritage through destruction and looting, and included presentations discussing corruption-related challenges to the looting, trafficking and sale of cultural property and cultural heritage globally. The event also addressed the relationship between this phenomenon and organized crime and the financing of terrorist activities and operations, with a particular focus on conflict areas and States in political transition. Italy and Jordan, the co-sponsors of the joint initiative launched in New York in September, opened the side event, which was followed by presentations from a diverse range of experts. A senior member of the Italian Carabinieri, specializing in the protection of cultural heritage, presented a video on the work of the Carabinieri on this important topic. In addition, presenters from UNODC, INTERPOL, UNDP, and the UN Global Compact discussed the work of the international community in support of Member States, international organizations and the private sector to address this phenomenon.

For additional information, please contact:

Jason Reichelt
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch
UNODC
reichelt@unodc.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Francesco Provenza, Italy
Celso Coracini, UNODC
Video

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13.00-14.30
Conference Room C

Fight against corruption: Azerbaijani best practices

Organizer: Azerbaijan

This event, organized by the Government of Azerbaijan, presented the opportunity to learn about the Azerbaijan experience in preventing and fighting corruption and in improving public service delivery. The focus of the presentations was on the approach taken by Azerbaijan to improve its system for provision of public services through the introduction of innovative one-stop-shop concept.
UNODC representative delivered an opening statement, underlining the importance of UNCAC as a global anti-corruption framework and as a platform for sharing country experiences. He further underlined the need for effective and simplified administrative processes, as required by the Convention. The representatives of Azerbaijan presented the main pillars of the country’s anti-corruption policy, and the approach of Azerbaijan to improving the delivery of public services, and in particular the ASAN system.

For additional information, please contact:

Ozxhan Isayev
Anticorruption Directorate
Azerbaijan
isayevozxan@yahoo.com

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Kamran Aliyev, Azerbaijan
Elchin Huseynli, Azerbaijan

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13.00-14.30
Conference Room D

Best practices in combating corruption and its impact on the enjoyment of human rights

Organizer: Plurinational State of Bolivia

The Bolivian Embassy in Switzerland organized a side event on best practices in combating corruption and its impact on the enjoyment of human rights. Panellists discussed the role of anti-corruption capacity building and the application of preventive measures as good practices to prevent corruption, as well as the deteriorating impact of corruption to human rights. Participants further discussed different strategies against corruption, including the use of assessment tools to determine anti-corruption strategies and the impact assessment methodologies. Guest speakers included representatives of Bolivia, Academia, UNODC and UNDP.

For additional information, please contact:

Daniela Llanos Sangüesa
daniela.llanos@mission-bolivia.ch

Agenda:
English
Spanish

Presentations:
Speedy Rice, Washington and Lee University
Nardi, Bolivia
Claudia Sayago, UNODC

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15.00-16.30
Conference Room A

Drafting corruption-proof legislation: What are the tools and who are the actors?

Organizer: UNDP, Republic of Korea, RAI, ANTICORRP

The special event was moderated by the Head of Anti-Corruption Policy of DFID, and guest speakers included representatives from the Republic of Korea, Moldova, Regional Anti-corruption Initiative (RAI), European Research Centre for Anti-Corruption and State-Building, Hertie School of Governance, ANTICORRP.
The panel discussed corruption proofing of legislative acts and governmental decisions for mitigating corruption risks. It highlighted existing examples of institutionalized corruption proofing and the challenges to the functioning of the tool as well as the correct ways to implement it. The panel explored the circumstances needed from the socio-political perspective as well as the technical level preconditions for the functioning of corruption proofing. The various elements and loopholes in legislations and regulations that may produce corruption were discussed; It was noted that mostly these were related to the discretion of public officials in interpretation and application of laws, existence of positions of authority without accountability and lack of precise definition of rights of citizens and businesses and of duties of the public administration. The possible solutions to dangerous discretions and legal interpretations were also debated, and speakers presented the strategies adopted in the Republic of Korea and in Moldova for the introduction and implementation of corruption proofing. The enabling circumstances for corruption proofing were identified, the importance of adjusting the tool to the local context and of having a strategy for engaging various national authorities was highlighted. From a broader perspective the necessity participation of civil society, political will and right institutional set up were identified and debated as the most important preconditions.

For additional information, please contact:

Shelley Inglis
United Nations Development Programme
Istanbul Regional Hub
Shelley.inglis@undp.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Alina Mungiu-Pippidi, ERCAS
Se-yeong Yoon, Korea
Cristina Tarna, Moldova

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14.30-16.00
Conference Room B

Addressing corruption challenges in an era of climate change

Organizer: Centre for International Human Rights, Northwestern University School of Law; OECD; UNCAC Coalition; TI; Washington and Lee College of Law

Tackling corruption is essential to meaningfully address climate change. This special event presented evidence of corruption risks that threaten ambitious global mitigation, adaptation targets, and responses to extreme weather disasters, and discussed how to effectively address those risks with prevention and enforcement.
The goal of this event was to help Governments understand the links between corruption risks and climate change and how UNCAC can provide a useful framework for addressing such risks. Although corruption and extreme weather are inextricably intertwined, their relationship to date has been too often ignored. Discussants from the OECD, Transparency International, GIZ, and Northwestern University School of Law explored how corruption undermines mitigation, adaptation, and loss and damage responses to extreme weather events. Specifically, the presenters spoke about preventing corruption in the wake of natural disasters; transparency and accountability in climate finance; and working with local communities on prioritizing both anti-corruption policies and natural resource management.
Thus the event went squarely to heart of the Conference in discussing key components of UNCAC: prevention, enforcement, technical training and mutual legal assistance. These priorities are consistent with and indeed complement the international community’s emphasis on resilience in response to extreme weather, natural disasters and climate change.

For additional information, please contact:

Juliet S. Sorensen
Clinical Associate Professor of Law
j-orensen@law.northwestern.edu

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Rukshana Nanayakkara, Transparency International
Leah Ambler, OECD
Juliet Sorensen, Northwestern University School of Law
Anne Christine Wegener, GIZ

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15.00-16.30
Conference Room C

Integrity and legacy in sport

Organizer: UNODC, International Centre for Sports Security

We have seen how sports-related crimes, such as money laundering and bribery, and fraudulent activities, such as match-fixing, involving sophisticated organized crime groups, have grown exponentially in recent time. This is due in part to inadequate or non-existent governance structures in many sports associations. Taking this into consideration, UNODC, the International Centre for Sports Security (ICSS) and the UN Global Compact partnered to organize a special side event which allowed experts from international organizations, civil society and businesses to share their experiences. The speakers included representatives from UNODC, ICSS, the UN Global Compact and MTN Nigeria. The State Secretary, Deputy Minister of Sport of the Russian Federation delivered a speech on the legal basis on countering corruption manifestations in the field of physical culture and sports in the Russian Federation. She highlighted the work undertaken in the Russian Federation in order to prosecute those involved in corruption in sports, including the adoption of a federal law in 2013.
Participants learned of the importance of international frameworks, in particular UNCAC, to help national public and private entities as well as sports governing bodies develop legislation (which is lacking in many countries in the world) and policies to help fight the scourge of corruption in sport. UNCAC helps spur domestic legislation and is also an instrument for international cooperation. It can be used as a basis to foster cooperation in cases involving criminal activities in sports and also to develop standard-setting model instruments and facilitate convergence in criminal justice responses help guide sports organizations, and public officials prevent criminal activity.
The event highlighted that corruption in sport is a global problem that requires multilateral cooperation, a coordinated and streamlined response, sharing of good practices and standards, creation of effective institutions to be able to investigate and prosecute this phenomenon, as well as awareness raising and education initiatives to effectively strengthen integrity in sport, prevent corruption and bring back the real ‘value’ of sports.
Participants also had the opportunity to learn more about the different ways businesses can engage, in a transparent manner, in sport sponsorship and the difficulties they often face.

For additional information, please contact:

Stuart Page
ICSS
Stuart.Page@theicss.org

Ronan O’Laoire
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch
UNODC
ronan.olaoire@unodc.org

Gemma Norman
Corruption and Economic Crime Branch
UNODC
gemma.norman@unodc.org

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Lea Cléret, ICCS

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15.30-17.00
Conference Room D

Compensating the social damage caused by corruption: an overview of best practices & challenges in implementing UNCAC Article 35

Organizer: UNCAC Coalition, Costa Rica

The UNCAC Coalition, jointly with Costa Rica, facilitated a special event on compensating the costs of corruption and the concept of social damage and best practices in implementing UNCAC’s article 35. The panel discussed current practices implementing article 35 in order to compensate social damage caused by corruption. Practical experiences implemented in Costa Rica were shared, including the use of class actions, as applicable in domestic legal systems. Panelists included officials from Costa Rica, representatives from the Council of Europe and the UNCAC Coalition.

For additional information, please contact:

Maud Perdriel-Vaissiere
UNCAC Coalition
mperdrielvaissiere@gmail.com

Agenda:
English

Presentations:
Ronald Víquez Solís, Costa Rica
Gladwell Otieno, AfriCOG
Juanita Olaya, UNCAC Coalition

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