#Hack4Justice: Students compete to develop games to boost rule of law
August 4, 2017

#Hack4Justice: Students compete to develop games to boost rule of law

This past week, UNODC's Education for Justice (E4J) initiative held its first ever hackathon (or coding challenge) in South Africa. The event - #Hack4Justice - saw some 34 secondary school students between the ages of 13 and 18 gather in Johannesburg, South Africa to battle it out at the keyboard and show off their ideas and talent in developing educational games focussing on justice and rule of law issues. The hackathon feeds into the development of a series of interactive tools to help students learn about these issues as part of the organization's Doha Declaration Global Programme.

Asia-Pacific academics gather to identify opportunities, challenges in using education to tackle corruption
July 28, 2017

Asia-Pacific academics gather to identify opportunities, challenges in using education to tackle corruption

In a bid to better gauge how to best integrate anti-corruption education into universities in the Asia-Pacific region, professors and researchers from some 15 countries from across the area recently gathered in Singapore for an Expert Group Meeting of the Anti-Corruption Academic Initiative (ACAD). The workshop - which tied in with the Education for Justice (E4J) initiative - was organized by UNODC and the National University of Singapore to provide a platform for academics from the region to share their experiences and good practices in introducing anti-corruption education at universities in their respective countries.

E4J call for proposals: funding for the development of non-electronic games
July 6, 2017

E4J call for proposals: funding for the development of non-electronic games

UNODC's Education for Justice (E4J) initiative is currently accepting applications for funding from institutions that are interested in creating non-electronic games to educate secondary level students (aged 13-18) on the issues of crime prevention, criminal justice and other rule  of law aspects. Civil society organizations , academic and/or research institutions may apply for a grant of up to USD 10,000. Applicants from any region of the world may apply. The resources shall be used by the successful candidates for the development and testing of non-electronic games and should involve secondary level students as well as educators in the process. The deadline for submission of proposals is  6 August 2017.

#Hack4Justice: Africa Teen Geeks & United Nations Partner to Reduce Crime
June 30, 2017

#Hack4Justice: Africa Teen Geeks & United Nations Partner to Reduce Crime

Under the Education for Justice (E4J) initiative of UNODC, the Office and Africa Teen Geeks have established a partnership to host a Hackathon at the end of July: #Hack4Justice. It will in particular challenge African youth at the secondary level to develop mobile and online games and apps dealing with crime issues in South Africa. The young participants will use their coding skills to teach people how to act as good citizens, steer clear of getting involved in criminal activities and avoid becoming victims of corruption or violence.

Have you ever wondered how much of your day can be impacted by organized crime?
June 20, 2017

Have you ever wondered how much of your day can be impacted by organized crime?

An often unconsidered reality: organized crime may be impacting our daily lives more than we can imagine. As criminal groups join ever more complex networks spanning the globe, crimes become increasingly transnational and diversified, and the ways they reap profits are becoming more creative as well. So what can we do to help stop this? Education and awareness-raising are of course key and to highlight the importance of this a side event at the United Nations General Assembly was held today in New York as part of UNODC's E4J initiative. Aimed at shedding light on this issue, showcasing the invaluable role of education, and highlighting to the public the type of ways in which they can reduce their exposure to organized crime, the event followed this week's High Level Discussion on Transnational Organized Crime in the General Assembly.